Remote Patient Monitoring: A Worthwhile Investment


TriageLogic

By Dr. Ravi Raheja

Remote patient monitoring is part of a new era of medical technology. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote services and technology have been extremely valuable to patients, doctors, and healthcare organizations. Remote patient care typically means helping patients over the phone. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) takes care one step further and helps doctors collect and evaluate data from patients who use an electronic medical device.

As we move forward, the value of remote patient monitoring will continue to evolve for healthcare. Click To Tweet

RPM is starting to gain traction by the medical field because it improves patient care. Many of these devices can capture data not observed by the patient. As a result, providers can monitor important vitals and intervene before a patient even presents a concerning symptom. This cuts down on both morbidity and mortality while saving costs and decreasing Emergency Room (ED) visits. A recent article in the Center for Technology and Aging asserts that the healthcare industry “could reduce its costs by nearly 200 billion dollars during the next twenty-five years if remote monitoring tools were used routinely in cases of congestive heart failure, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and chronic wounds or skin ulcers.”

There are many questions for providers and hospitals to ask themselves as innovative technology continues to become available. Technology is an investment, and changes to existing systems require effort. Is remote patient monitoring worth it, and will it soon be the standard of care for chronically ill patients? What are some requirements to consider while setting up an RPM program?

Which Patients Benefit Most from RPM?

According to the CDC, six in ten Americans have a chronic condition such as heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes. Four in ten have two or more chronic conditions. These chronic patients help make up more than eighty five percent of the 3.5 trillion dollars in healthcare costs across the nation annually and are responsible for eighty percent of all hospital admissions. It costs 3.5 times more money to treat chronically ill patients than those without these conditions, and they make up many of the leading causes of death in Americans.

RPM is especially effective for these types of patients. Continuous management of chronic conditions is burdensome in traditional office or clinic settings. Patients bring in notebooks or phone apps filled with notes, self-assessments, and symptoms. The onus is on the patient, and the reliability of that data falls into the hands of individuals, which can result in inconsistent or partially inaccurate information. RPM takes this burden from patients and relies on accurate, consistent technology. It also allows providers to measure additional important vitals and to receive the information daily.

Chronic health patients have been on the rise. We need solutions to help treat these patients in an effective and economical way. RPM addresses these needs.

How RPM Helps Manage Chronic Care Costs

A study published by the National institute of Health in 2016 by doctors Usha Sambamoorthi, Xi Tan, and Arijita Deb states that “The presence of MCC [multiple chronic conditions] has profound healthcare utilization and cost implications for public and private insurance payers, individuals, and families.”

These conditions require detailed, comprehensive care that can prove challenging. RPM allows for nurses and doctors to have access to health information of a patient in real time, and makes it possible for clinicians to issue health orders that can curb unnecessary emergency department visits by reacting to changes seen from a patient’s monitoring device.

It also gives doctors more access to their patients and creates opportunity for early education in patient behavior and an overview of patient participation in their treatment plan. Doctors can get a look into a patient’s activity and use nurses for check-ins to encourage the patient to comply with health orders. It gives doctors the power to give quality care outside of clinical settings and increases health outcomes. RPM gives doctors the information they need on a timely basis, which allows for swift intervention for high-risk patients.

Benefits to Providers

One concern for doctors when implementing RPM is the possibility of an increased workload, with doctors having to monitor patients regularly even when the patient is not receiving direct care. Doctor burnout is common, and its alleviation has its own value. An Ernst and Young’s 2018 survey on digital health showed that almost sixty five percent of physicians believe that “technology that captures consumer-generated data will reduce the burden on doctors and nurses specifically.”

However, there are solutions for providers to cut down on their work while providing better patient care through RPM. First, most monitoring devices have their technology programmed to inform the provider when there are anomalies or potential patient problems. Second, doctors can also use an outside remote nurse service to monitor the data coming from the devices. An efficient RPM company who provides this service can improve patient care while decreasing the workload on the physicians.

Industry Willingness to Implement RPM

According to a Spyglass Consulting Group report in 2019, at least 88 percent of healthcare organizations have an interest in investing in some form of remote patient monitoring technology to pivot to value-based care. Eighty-nine percent of practices surveyed in Spyglass’s report say that they are actively drafting strategies to get patients to take an active, continuous role in managing their chronic health issues. RPM as a prong to this strategy gives a continuous link between patient and doctor, and it supports these kinds of initiatives.

Health insurance companies have shown an interest as well. In 2019 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services proposed several amendments designed to increase remote patient monitoring programs by improving reimbursements. Some of these amendments include reimbursements for RPM setup and patient education, which is a big incentive to providers who are thinking of implementing this technology. Revisions to who may monitor these devices have also occurred. This allows registered nurses (RNs) or medical assistants to do the bulk of the monitoring, freeing up physicians and nurse practitioners.

Conclusion

Remote patient monitoring offers a way for practices, hospitals, and health insurance companies to lower their costs, deliver continuous quality care, and alleviate doctor workloads. As we move forward, the value of remote patient monitoring will continue to evolve for healthcare organizations and implemented into care plans for the chronically ill.

TriageLogic

Dr. Ravi Raheja is the medical director at TriageLogic, a leader in telehealth technology and services. If you have any questions on how to implement remote monitoring for your patients, contact TriageLogic at info@triagelogic.com.