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How Triage Nurses Can Help Patients with Mental Health Conditions


TriageLogic

By Ravi K. Raheja

Telephone triage nurses have a more important role than ever before. Nearly one in five U.S. adults lives with a mental illness (44.7 million in 2016), which is why many adults with mental illnesses go untreated (60 percent according to a report from USA Today). This article addresses the growing concerns for mental health awareness and education.

Telephone triage nurses are often the first point of contact for those struggling with a mental illness and can help a patient recognize the need for intervention. So, what can telephone triage nurses do to help?

Provide Accurate and Timely Triage

Telephone triage nurses are often the first point of contact for a patient with mental health symptoms and as a result, nurses should be patient, flexible, and have great communication and listening skills. The nurse must combine both clinical judgment and emotional connections to assess the patient’s situation to identify possible mental health issues. The telephone triage nurse’s role is to obtain the most accurate medical history and assessment to rule out medical symptoms that require immediate attention.

Remove Biases That Can Impact the Triage Process

Good telephone triage nurses always remove any biases and stereotypes. Having preconceived notions and distinctive sets of thinking can lead to error in the treatment of patients.

Assess the Environment

The Emergency Nurses Association recommends treating patient agitation as if it’s “the chest pain of behavioral emergencies.” Key phrases such as “I understand” can help place a patient at ease and give them the space to talk to the nurse. Throughout the call, the nurse should assess the patient’s environment and resources available to determine the most appropriate care plan.

Manage Uncertainty

Not all patients will be able to accurately describe their condition, history, medical conditions, or other pertinent information. It is up to the nurse to decipher this uncertainty.

  • Assess the situation: How is the patient presenting? Is his or her speech coherent? Are they answering questions appropriately? Hallucinating? Delusional? Rambling?
  • Address the whole patient: One common occurrence within mental health care is “diagnostic overshadowing.” This happens when the focus on a patient’s mental health diagnosis overshadows their physical health needs.
  • Be an advocate: Triage nurses are the first to communicate with, provide support to, and manage patients with psychiatric or mental health issues. Acting as a patient’s initial advocate can be life-changing for that patient

In Conclusion

Triage nurses always have the callers’ safety in mind. They combine both clinical judgment and emotional connections to assess the patient’s situation and to identify possible mental health issues. Nurses need to know the local emergency assistance numbers in case they need to reach out for more assistance. Just talking about their problems for a length of time can help a great deal for many callers who might be suffering from a mental illness.

TriageLogic

Ravi K. Raheja, MD is the COO and medical director of the TriageLogic Group. Founded in 2005, TriageLogic is a URAC accredited, physician-led provider of high-quality telehealth services, nurse triage, triage education, and software for telephone medicine. Their comprehensive triage solution includes integrated mobile access and two-way video capability. The TriageLogic group serves over 7,000 physicians and covers over 18 million lives nationwide. For more information visit www.triagelogic.com and www.continuwell.com.

October/November 2019 Issue of AnswerStat

Read the October issue of AnswerStat, the information hub for healthcare contact centers.



Feature Content:

AS TOC-October 2019

Using Device Data and Nurse Triage to Improve VA Healthcare, by Ravi RahejaCall center solutions that incorporate effective communication using telephone triage nurses, with valuable wearable device data, will greatly improve the level of VA healthcare services… read more >>

Vital Signs: Today’s Employees Want to Make a Difference, by Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhDToday’s employees want a job that does more than provide income. They want work that lets them make a difference. Give them these opportunities, and they’ll give you their dedication… read more >>

Vendor Spotlight on AccessNurse (formerly TeamHealth Medical Call Center)As TeamHealth Medical Call Center evolved, they outgrew their brand identity and core message. Check out the backstory of their new brand and logo…. read more >>

The Call Center’s Role in Behavior Counseling, by Nicole LimpertCombining communication and health technologies, makes individuals, families, and communities more connected to mental health care. This network of support builds a stronger and more mentally healthy society…. read more >>

Ten years ago: Access Management: Appointment Scheduling and Beyond, by Sue AltmanLet appointment scheduling raise the profile of your call center and put you in a stronger, more stable position within your organization…. read more >>

Industry News

Call4Health
TriageLogic
1Call
Startel
AccessNurse, A TeamHealth Company
Ambs Call Center
AAACN
Citra Health Solutions
Call Center Sales Pro, providing proven healthcare call center solutions
Pulsar360

About AnswerStat
AnswerStat is the information hub for healthcare contact center news and resources, published specifically for hospital and medical contact centers and distributed free to qualified readers, decision makers, and influencers at hospitals and healthcare contact centers worldwide.

Contact us for more information.

Vendor Spotlight on AccessNurse (formerly TeamHealth Medical Call Center) How and Why We Rebranded Our Company


AccessNurse, A TeamHealth Company

As the TeamHealth Medical Call Center evolved over time, we outgrew our brand identity and core message, which is a natural part of every dynamic, growing business. We’re excited to share with you our new look and brand. 

Don’t get us wrong. We love our old brand and people loved it too, but it just doesn’t reveal the entire picture of who we are today and how we’ve evolved during the past several years. We’re not only changing our logo, but also our messaging and how we show up in the marketplace. 

Why We Changed Our Brand

Before we dive into our new logo, come with us behind the brand and allow us to explain how we got where we are today. We want to share with you the story of what we value as a company and strive to do for our clients.

Our previous logo mainly reflected our parent company, TeamHealth, and although they are a major part of our story, it’s just one strand of the fabric of our brand’s DNA. We created our medical call center in 1996 primarily for the purpose of providing support to TeamHealth physicians. It wasn’t long before TeamHealth recognized the need for medical call center services at a national level, so we began to grow and acquire external clients.

More than two decades later, we have evolved to become a premiere provider of medical call center solutions, providing services to more than 15,000 providers in individual and group practices, hospital systems, universities, community health centers, and other medical organizations across the country. Our brand today is more dynamic than it has ever been, so we felt the time was right to make the change. 

Introducing AccessNurse: Behind the AccessNurse Name and Logo

Access Nurse

Since our conception, providing access to medical care has been the underlying theme and pulse of the call center. It’s woven into every fabric of our brand: from our story to how we treat our clients and their patients. 

We feel our new AccessNurse name is a textual representation of what we provide, believe in, and represent: providing clients and patients with 24/7 access to definitive nurse care. We also supplemented our name with the tagline, “A TeamHealth Company” to reinforce our alignment with TeamHealth and the medical integrity, experience, and resources that go along with that relationship.

The challenge with every logo design is finding a symbol that visually represents your core message. The icon we chose is a representation of the multiple solutions we use to provide a comprehensive and customized call center solution to meet each client’s unique needs.

We wanted our new logo to pop—something that jumps out and makes a statement. We chose to use multiple colors instead of one. While each color has its own meaning, they also represent the variety of services we provide. We share three of the icon colors with TeamHealth to maintain a solid visual connection to our parent company. The fourth color—the burnt orange—represents our evolution as an independent medical call center and how our brand will continue to evolve and differentiate itself over time.

Another challenge in logo design is creating something with meaning behind it. Besides the rings and color variations, if you look closely at the center of the icon, you’ll notice the shape of a medical cross in the negative space. It’s a subliminal message that reinforces our primary purpose: providing high quality, compassionate medical care with uncompromised standards and unfaltering compassion. It’s the promise we make to every client.

There you have it. Our new brand identity and logo design. We hope you’re as excited as we are about the new look and the evolution behind it. For more information about our solutions and how AccessNurse can meet your organization’s needs, please contact us at 844-277-6312.

Matt Miller is the marketing coordinator with AccessNurse. Learn more at their new website: www.accessnurse24.com.

The Call Center’s Role in Behavior Counseling


1Call-call center

By Nicole Limpert

The term mental health refers to the condition of a person’s emotional, psychological, and social well-being. The state of one’s mental health affects how they feel, think, and behave. At times, an individual may experience one or more adverse mental health concerns. Mental health issues are common and treatable. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NAMI), one in five adults in the United States experiences mental illness in any given year.

It is crucial that people have access to mental health services. Mental illness is a disease and sometimes it may cause an individual to experience behavior that poses an immediate threat to themselves, to people around them, or to property. Unfortunately, research indicates that roughly two-thirds of people in the United States, with diagnosable mental health conditions, do not receive services.

Barriers to mental health treatment are being reduced by creating a network of care through technology. Call centers provide a critical service in this endeavor by using state-of-the-art communication systems to improve the state of mental health care.

Barriers to Mental Health Treatment

Many studies and surveys have uncovered why most Americans with mental health conditions do not receive care. The most common reasons discovered include financial hardships, racial and cultural differences and misunderstandings, lack of mental health services, and social stigma.

To better understand how people experience these challenges in the real world, here are some ways people who live in rural communities may experience these obstacles:

  • Transportation Hardship: Access to care may require time off work and lost wages for long-distance travel and/or coordinating and paying for transport if a reliable vehicle isn’t available (low-cost public transport usually isn’t an option).
  • Absence of Culturally Competent Care: According to the Morbidity and Mortality Week Report (MMWR) published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in November 2017, more than twenty percent of rural residents identify as American Indians or persons of color. Multiple studies indicate that racially and ethnically diverse populations contend with language and cultural barriers when accessing healthcare.
  • Shortage of Mental Health Professionals: Rural and low-income areas have the lowest percent of behavioral health workers in the United States, due in part to billing restrictions and low provider reimbursement rates, especially for Medicaid, which has higher enrollment in rural populations.
  • Lack of Anonymity: It can be difficult to maintain privacy in close-knit, rural communities. Many people choose to suffer with their condition(s) instead of seeking help because of the social stigma associated with mental illness.

Crisis Call Center Care

Telehealth is helping to overcome barriers and increase access to mental health care. Crisis call centers connect those who are experiencing a mental health event with behavioral health professionals and are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Many call centers offer online chat, text communication, and real-time interpretation services (including American Sign Language via video chat) as well. Some specialized centers even have software specifically designed to dispatch mobile crisis teams to people in need of more intense treatment. These integrated technologies enable people to receive professional care in-person, in the privacy of their own homes.

Call center managers can track outcomes using reporting technology and are able to see if and when a caller received services from a mental health facility for ongoing care.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Call centers are a critical part of the system that makes up the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) network. This kind of crisis service system can provide Level Five “Close and Fully Integrated” care by implementing an integrated suite of software applications.

According to the NSPL, the components of this system are:

  • Status Disposition for Intensive Referral: A comprehensive list of people who are waiting for care, including information about their wait-time and location.
  • 24/7 Outpatient Scheduling: Crisis call center staff have access to electronic appointment information.
  • Shared Bed Inventory Tracking: Access to information about how many beds are available in an area or state, where they are located, and what type of care a person can receive at that location.
  • High-Tech, GPS-enabled Mobile Crisis Dispatch: Information about the location of the closest available mobile care team.
  • Real-Time Performance Outcomes Dashboards: Provides analytics information regarding operator workflows and performance to indicate the speed people are receiving help.

Connections Save Lives

Studies unequivocally show the use of integrated communication technology is providing better access to mental health treatment. Current health technology solutions are being enhanced with the use of mental health apps for more accurate data that leads to customized care. Telehealth technology provides a clear path to help coordinate this care and improve mental health outcomes.

Leveraging communication and health technologies together makes individuals, families, and communities more connected to mental health care. This creates a network of support to build a stronger and more mentally healthy society.

1Call

Nicole Limpert is the marketing content writer for Amtelco and their 1Call Healthcare Division. Amtelco is a leading provider of innovative communication applications. 1Call develops software solutions and applications designed for the specific needs of healthcare organizations.

Today’s Employees Want to Make a Difference



Give Staff Opportunities to Make an Impact through Their Work

By Peter Lyle DeHaan, Ph.D.

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan

We’ve been considering five strategies to retain call center staff. The first four are through agent compensation, agent benefits, learning situations, and growth potential. Now we’ll address the fifth one. It’s showing staff how they can make a difference in their work and through their work. Today’s employees, especially Millennials and even more so Gen-Z, want employment where they can make a difference by having a positive influence through their jobs and their work.

Through Each Call

Starting at training, and reinforced on a regular basis, help employees see how each call they take makes a difference. This difference can positively impact both the caller and the person, department, or recipient of the transaction or information. This way they’ll have dozens or even hundreds of opportunities each day to make the world a little bit better. Over the course of a year that’s thousands or tens of thousands of small but meaningful positive interactions to help impact their world in a positive way.

In the Work Environment

Beyond each call, provide opportunities for employees to help make their workplace better. This can include serving on an ad hoc committee, assigning them additional tasks that add value, and taking on special assignments to improve their work environment and better serve callers. Even more beneficial is when they can work together as a team when making a difference.

Offer Volunteer Opportunities

Some progressive companies include paid time for employees to volunteer at their favorite nonprofit. When doing so, they perceive their employer as supporting the causes that they support. They value their work more because of this.

Though it may not be feasible for a medical call center to offer this benefit to every entry-level employee, this paid volunteer time could be a perk for senior operators and those who advance in the company.

And even if you’re reluctant to provide paid time for staff to do this, you can still support their favorite nonprofit in other ways. This could be as simple as offering them free voicemail service to help facilitate their favorite organizations’ communication.

Provide Matching Donations

Other forward-thinking businesses will match employee donations, usually dollar for dollar, to nonprofit organizations. Usually they place a cap on total matching funds, but this may be an unneeded precaution.

But if you’re just starting this program, having a donation cap may be an easy way to test its effectiveness and limit financial risk. You can always remove or increase the cap later. Some companies have a list of acceptable recipients for matching donations, but this could irritate employees and cause them to resent the company’s generosity and not appreciate it.

The key is to join your employees in supporting what they support. And when you do, they’ll be more supportive of you.

Summary

Today’s employees want a job that does more than provide income. They want work that helps them make a difference in their community and their world. Give them these opportunities, and they’ll give you their dedication.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is the publisher and editor-in-chief of AnswerStat. He’s a passionate wordsmith whose goal is to change the world one word at a time.

Using Device Data and Nurse Triage to Improve VA Healthcare


TriageLogic

By Ravi Raheja

New technologies are transforming how clinicians deliver healthcare. At the same time, digital solutions alone are not enough to help patients. Incorporating some human component increases patient compliance and education, further reducing healthcare costs. Medical call centers should be adopting software and increasing the role of triage nurses to complement traditional care settings, such as the VA. 

Device Data

For example, digital diabetes prevention and treatment platforms connect users with support communities and health coaches who can remotely monitor chronic conditions such as weight, blood sugar, diet, and medicine intake. Thresholds and alerts can be set up to alert healthcare providers about abnormal and potentially abnormal or dangerous values. While the devices can collect and transmit data and even have a certain threshold, a medical professional still needs to interpret the data and then direct patients about the next steps based on the data and in the context of their symptoms and current health status.

Telephone Triage

Telephone triage nurses play a vital role in interpreting the data and providing appropriate follow up for patients who use these technologies. They act as the first line of screening when an alert or abnormal value is reported. They have the training to talk to patients, assess their symptoms, and determine the next best steps based on combining the data with the full patient assessment over the phone.

To assess patients and direct them appropriately, the nurses need triage protocols. Most medical call centers use the gold standard protocols from Schmitt-Thompson to assess symptoms. Call centers should also incorporate robust protocol builders, a technology that enables an organization to modify existing protocols to meet their needs and create new protocols when required.

Custom Protocols

By using custom-developed protocols, triage nurses can assess a patient using the data received from devices with appropriate next steps for medical care. As a result, triage nurses play a significant role in this new digital era, driven by value-based care. By combining the data from devices and other sources with innovative triage technology, triage nurses can act as the bridge between patients and providers. This creates a viable monitoring solution that provides cost-effective care.

In conjunction with the custom protocols, organizations should use platforms to put in custom workflows. As an example, once a nurse has determined the appropriate level of care, they can now further direct the patient to specific care locations, referral numbers, or provide handouts via text or email. This allows the triage nurse to serve as an effective first point of contact and get the patients to the appropriate next steps on the first call.

Mobile App

Finally, look for companies that can provide an optional mobile app to enable patients to take advantage of increased self-service, access to customized resources, and insight into their own information.

Summary

Technology is changing the access, monitoring and delivery of healthcare. Value-based solutions are now possible to optimize patient care and decrease healthcare expenses.

Call center solutions that incorporate effective communication using telephone triage nurses, coupled with valuable wearable device data, will be able to greatly improve the level of VA healthcare services for veterans and their families.   

TriageLogic

Ravi K. Raheja, MD is the COO and medical director of the TriageLogic Group. Founded in 2005, TriageLogic is a URAC accredited, physician-led provider of high-quality telehealth services, nurse triage, triage education, and software for telephone medicine. Their comprehensive triage solution includes integrated mobile access and two-way video capability. The TriageLogic group serves over 7,000 physicians and covers over 18 million lives nationwide. For more information visit www.triagelogic.com and www.continuwell.com.

TeamHealth Medical Call Center Rebrands as AccessNurse

Started in 1996 to support TeamHealth physicians, TeamHealth Medical Call Center evolved over time, outgrowing its brand identity and core message, which is a natural part of every dynamic, growing business. Now, more than two decades later, they have evolved to become a premiere provider of medical call center solutions, offering services to more than fifteen thousand providers in individual and group practices, hospital systems, universities, community health centers, and other medical organizations across the United States. Today they are more dynamic than ever, and their new brand of AccessNurse reflects this reality.

AccessNurse, A TeamHealth Company

Since their conception, providing access to medical care has been the underlying theme and pulse of the call center. Woven into every fabric of their new brand is the word access: from their story to how they treat clients and their patients. The new AccessNurse name is a textual representation of what they offer, believe in, and represent: providing clients and patients with 24/7 access to definitive nurse care. They also supplement this new name with the tagline, “A TeamHealth Company” to reinforce their alignment with TeamHealth and the medical integrity, experience, and resources that go along with that relationship.

1Call Expands Architecture Solutions Team to Support Growing Customer Base

1Call, a division of Amtelco and a leader in developing software solutions and applications designed for the specific needs of the healthcare call center marketplace, announced the promotion of Amber Schroedl to solutions architect.

“Amber has been a key part of our success, and brings a unique, real-world set of skills to our department,” said Kevin Mahoney, director of solutions architecture. “We are thrilled to promote her to this important position and serve our customers better by reducing implementation and go-live times.

The Solutions Architecture Team supports existing and potential customers by performing live product demonstrations, providing custom documentation and templates, and validating customer’s voice, data, internet, and cloud computing application requirements to ensure effective use of all communication solutions.

1Call features a complete line of modular solutions specifically designed to streamline enterprise-wide healthcare communications, save an organization’s limited resources, and make them tremendously efficient by helping them bring wellness to their patients and their bottom line. 

1Call, a division of Amtelco

For more information visit www.1Call.com.

The August/September 2019 Issue of AnswerStat

Read the August issue of AnswerStat, the information hub for healthcare contact centers.



Feature Content:

AS TOC-August 2019

Mitigating Medical Call Center Risk, by Traci Haynes
Hospitals throughout the country are aggressively tackling performance improvement within their own organizations, and evidence shows their efforts are working, helping to reduce risk…. read more >>

Vital Signs: Retain Staff by Establishing Their Growth Potential, by Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD
When talented staff sees the employee growth potential for their career within your organization, they are more likely to stick around so they can realize the possibilities.… read more >>

Cyber Security and HIPAA in a Medical Contact Center, by Bobby Bennett
With SMS, text messages could remain on a device. If it’s recycled, lost, or accessible to unauthorized persons, HIPAA violations may occur. You must provide safeguards to reduce your exposure to these risks…. read more >>

Disaster Coverage: The Critical Role Hospital Call Centers Play During and After a Catastrophe, by Nicole Limpert
Organized communication and the efficient use of community resources during a crisis helps save lives and speed recovery efforts…. read more >>

Should We Worry about Physician Burnout? by Shannon Bays-Crockett
By using accredited health call centers for after-hours telephone triage, healthcare providers can enjoy their professional as well as their private lives…. read more >>

State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University
Check out this case study of SUNY Upstate Medical University’s call center, Epic Systems, and 1Call…. read more >>

Ten years ago: The Advantages of Automated Appointment Reminders
Healthcare organizations use automated reminder systems to streamline operations, lower costs, enhance patient relations, and gain a competitive edge.… read more >>

Industry News

        

Call4Health      TriageLogic

1Call      Startel

AccessNurse, A TeamHealth Company       Ambs Call Center

AAACN       Citra Health Solutions

Call Center Sales Pro, providing proven healthcare call center solutions      Pulsar360


About AnswerStat
AnswerStat is the information hub for healthcare contact center news and resources, published specifically for hospital and medical contact centers and distributed free to qualified readers, decision makers, and influencers at hospitals and healthcare contact centers worldwide.

Contact us for more information.

Mitigating Medical Call Center Risk


LVM Systems

By Traci Haynes

Does the word risk evoke an emotional connotation? Regardless of the inference and based on life experience, the word can carry an emotive element. There are uncertainties in risk, which may be associated with hobbies, tasks, or employment. 

Calculated risk is one in which a chance is taken after careful consideration and estimation of the probable outcome. Healthcare organizations employ risk managers to identify and evaluate risks to reduce injury to patients, staff, and visitors within the organization. 

The five basic steps of risk management include: 

  1. establish the context
  2. identify risks
  3. analyze risk
  4. evaluate risks
  5. treat/manage risks
Minimizing risk is essential in the medical call center environment. Consider your potential for risk; then analyze, evaluate, and manage it. Click To Tweet

Risks do exist in a medical call center. There are employee risks and patient risks. These can include risks from the physical environment, clinical management, and technology. What can organizations do to help mitigate these risks? Be calculative, carefully considering and estimating probable outcomes. Even doing so will not eliminate total risk.

An excellent resource that covers information on risk is The Art and Science of Telephone Triage: How to Practice Nursing over the Phone. It is a book written by two industry leaders in the field of telehealth nursing practice, Carol Rutenberg, RN-BC, C-TNP, MNSc, and M. Elizabeth Greenberg, RN-BC, C-TNP, PhD. The book also documents the history of telephone triage and its subsequent evolution, real case scenarios, a chapter of FAQs, best practices, and other topics. 

Minimizing risk is essential in the medical call center environment. Consider your potential for risk; then analyze, evaluate, and manage it. Also essential is focusing on ways in which the medical call center can support the organization’s risk avoidance. Of utmost importance to every organization is supporting the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim initiative and optimizing health system performance of better outcomes, lower costs, and improved patient experience. 

Hospitals throughout the country are aggressively tackling performance improvement within their own organizations, and evidence shows their efforts are working, helping to reduce risk. The recent addition of a fourth aim emphasizes the importance of improving the experiences of those in the workforce who provide healthcare. The Quadruple Aim focuses not only on better outcomes, lower costs, and improved patient experience, but also on improved clinician experience. 

A medical call center’s number one asset is its staff. Employees need to feel recognized for the work they do. Their working environment should encourage respect and foster a sense of belonging and purpose. They should have the ability to influence their work, as well as given opportunities for professional growth.

Let’s drill down a little further on potential risks in a medical call center. Please note this is not an all-inclusive list and not in order of importance. However, it is information to consider. 

Clinical Management

  • Clinical oversight (such as the medical director): approval of clinical content, decision support tools, educational material, medications, orders, etc.
  • Job descriptions: title, clear description of work duties, purpose, special skills, and qualifications for the position
  • Scope of service: what type and for whom 
  • State Board of Nursing Nurse Practice Act: Follow standards of practice
  • Licensure: state license, Nurse Licensure Compact 
  • Orientation/Training/Preceptor: defined program with monitoring, feedback, and evaluation
  • Policies and procedures: associated with call handling and call scenarios
  • Performance monitoring/evaluations: formal approach using call records and/or call recording
  • Continuous quality improvement: process to identify issues, implement/monitor corrective action, and evaluate the effectiveness

Technology 

  • Electronic Health Record (EHR): access and by whom
  • Computers: hardware/software, latest recommendations, updates, backup, and archiving
  • Database: decision support tools and functionality for a standard method of documentation of the encounter, optimizing the intake of information, and supporting a consistent approach to provision of information and directions for care; reporting of outcomes
  • Telephone system: supports call handling that may include auto-attendant, call routing, tracking average speed of answer, time in queue, abandonment; real-time monitoring, reports, and recording of calls
  • Chat/email/texts/photos: accept and save as part of EHR
  • HIPAA compliant: protecting health information

Physical Environment

  • Outdoor surveillance monitoring
  • Lighting: internal measurement, general, task, emergency, external
  • Security locks: after-hours or 24/7
  • Parking: onsite, offsite, monitored, lighting
  • Security personnel: onsite, offsite
  • Sound: acoustics, masking, privacy 
  • Workstation ergonomics: standing/sitting, monitor height/distance, keyboard/mouse position, adjustable chair with height/arm height/back support, headset, and so forth. 
  • Repetitive stress injuries: most commonly affects injuries to the upper extremities (wrists, elbows, and hands) due to repetitive keyboard activities

Patients and Families

  • Medical call center access: 24/7, after-hours, business hours, community service, or provider/payer service
  • Reason of call: emergent, urgent, semi-urgent, and non-urgent
  • Language and culture: linguistically and culturally appropriate and using an individual’s primary language
  • Age-specific or all age groups
  • Social determinants of health: influences an individual’s quality of health
  • Past medical history: health status prior to encounter and effect on the reason of call/disposition
  • Chronic conditions: type, number, affect the reason for call/disposition
  • Medications: routine, prn, affect the reason for call/disposition
  • Preventive health: affect overall health
  • Disabilities: type, affect the reason for call/disposition
  • Disposition: collaborative decision, access for care as needed
LVM Systems

Traci Haynes, MSN, RN, BA, CEN, CCCTM, is the director of clinical services at LVM Systems, Inc.