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Protocols Updated to Cover Coronavirus


TriageLogic

To address Coronavirus concerns, Doctors Schmitt and Thompson have updated their Clinical Content protocols. The coronavirus protocols include appropriate questions to screen patients who may be at risk as well as dispositions based on symptoms and exposure. The protocols also contain pertinent information from a public health reporting perspective to help prevent the spread of the virus. 

The coronavirus protocols include appropriate questions to screen patients who may be at risk as well as dispositions based on symptoms and exposure. Click To Tweet

Coronavirus is a respiratory disease caused by a new strain of coronavirus, first detected in China, has now been diagnosed throughout most of the world. The virus is named SARS-CoV-2, and the disease it causes has been named coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated COVID-19. On January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern. 

At this time, there is no vaccine to protect against COVID-19 and no medications approved to treat it. According to the CDC, nonpharmaceutical interventions are the most important response strategy. As the virus outbreak continues to evolve, TriageLogic will provide its clients with the latest information to allow for the best-possible patient care. 

TriageLogic

Contact TriageLogic if you have questions about their protocols or if you would like their triage nurses to be available to answer your patient phone calls. To learn more about COVID-19, see information from the World Health Organization

TriageLogic Implements Emergency COVID-19 Hotlines and Remote Care Solutions


TriageLogic

TriageLogic announced easy-to-implement solutions that hospitals, medical organizations, and health centers can use for patient care during the COVID-19 crisis. As the healthcare sector adapts to the coronavirus pandemic, many medical professionals work around the clock to implement emergency support solutions for patients who present worrying symptoms, as well as those who need help understanding the guidelines for care. 

A COVID19 hotline is available 24/7 to screen patient questions, provide information, and follow scripts on behalf of specific practices and medical groups. Click To Tweet

The following solutions have minimal implementation time requirements:

  • A Coronavirus-trained hotline is available 24/7 to screen patient questions, provide information, and follow scripts on behalf of specific practices and medical groups. With a significant increase in patient calls, the ability to discern which ones require additional medical attention and which are only seeking advice is paramount to a functional office staff. 
  • Nurse triage software with Covid-19 protocols, through MyTriageChecklist, is a fast-to-train, web-enabled software that provides continuity in patient care and education. It takes less than an hour to implement, does not store any sensitive patient information, and offers an easy-to-use interface to ensure nurses consistently ask and document all relevant questions related to patient symptoms. 
  • Remote call center with phone system can enable your certified nurses to work at any location connected to a call center-grade, HIPAA-compliant phone system. This allows an organization to keep their clinical staff at home and coordinate as a team to remotely evaluate patients.

“We are working around the clock to help our current clients as well as other health centers put processes in place to help patients and concerned callers. We are also working with remote monitoring companies to have a process in place to help patients at risk, or after a hospitalization at their homes,” said TriageLogic’s Ravi Raheja, MD.

TriageLogic

TriageLogic offers easy to implement solutions for healthcare organizations to address the COVID-19 crisis. This includes setting up information hotlines, giving nurses the tools to evaluate patients over the phone, and helping set up remote call center phone systems. Visit www.triagelogic.com for more information or email info@triagelogic.com.

Implementing Virtual Call Centers with Telehealth Systems to Address COVID-19


TriageLogic

TriageLogic announced a quick-to-deploy and easy-to-use telehealth system with a virtual call center that hospitals, medical organizations, and health centers can use for patient care during the COVID-19 crisis.

As health organizations adapt to the coronavirus pandemic, they look for a system they can deploy quickly for staff and nurses to work remotely to set up doctor visits, answer patient questions, evaluate their symptoms, and determine who needs further evaluation by a doctor. Team members can communicate with their physicians and set up two-way video visits using secure, HIPAA-compliant texting options that do not require the use of a mobile app. This allows the remote hospital associates to set up and coordinate telehealth visits for doctors instead of in-person visits.

Nurses can also be included in the solution by having COVID-19 and other medical protocols available in a web-based system. The information from the phone call can be exported to the hospital’s EMR system or be integrated with Salesforce.

TriageLogic was able to set up a telehealth system within a couple of days for our nurses and doctors to work remotely and continue their medical visits. Click To Tweet

TriageLogic can deploy the following solutions related to sending staff home:

  • Cloud-based HIPAA compliant call center telephony system for coordination of remote staff
  • Phone system to connect remote workers with queueing and full contact center capability
  • COVID-19 nurse triage protocols for use with existing EMR or CRM such as Salesforce
  • Web-based triage software with COVID-19 and other protocols
  • Coordination of telemedicine visits between non-clinical, nurses, and doctors in client EMR
  • TriageLogic assists in recommending efficient workflow and implementation of two-way video visits

Additional solutions such as a fully staffed COVID-19 hotline and remote patient monitoring are also available. “TriageLogic was able to set up a telehealth system within a couple of days for our nurses and doctors to work remotely and continue their medical visits,” said Melinda, director of PPM business operations for a large children’s hospital.

TriageLogic

Visit www.TriageLogic.com or email info@triagelogic.com for more information.

Emergency Medical and Continuity Remote Care Solutions to Address the Coronavirus Outbreak


TriageLogic

By Ravi K. Raheja, MD

The Covid-19 pandemic continues to change nearly all parts of our lives and businesses. As a result of this national emergency, medical professionals, hospitals, and organizations are working around the clock to implement emergency support solutions for patients presenting worrying symptoms as well as those who need help understanding the guidelines for care.  

This article focuses on emergency solutions that providers can implement quickly in this time of crisis.

Set-up a Virtual Doctor Office

We understand that virtual visits are going to be necessary to save time and decrease in-person patient contact. However, medical practices must consider how to create a system that allows medical visits to continue as if they were in the office. 

Here are some things to consider:

Doctors can evaluate patients over the phone and prescribe. Many practices already have the technology to see patients virtually, and there are several platforms available that healthcare providers, who do not yet have the technology, can implement quickly. When selecting a technology, choose a vendor that can provide HIPAA-safe calls, record information as needed, and make it easy to access without a mobile application.

Medical practices must consider how to create a system that allows medical visits to continue as if they were in the office.  Click To Tweet

Nurses play a vital role in helping contain the epidemic and alleviate the calls that go to the doctors. Nurses need to use triage protocols (including COVID-19 protocols) to evaluate and determine which patients require a consultation with a doctor. The protocols experience regular updates, written by doctors, as the latest information becomes available. These protocols are available for free from TriageLogic.

Software System

Look for a company that can quickly implement a virtual office that allows front desk, nurses, and doctors to continue working and operating remotely as if they were in an office. Vendors that have a record of working with doctors can implement these solutions quickly and affordably.

TriageLogic

Ravi K. Raheja, MD is the COO and medical director of the TriageLogic Group. Founded in 2005, TriageLogic is a URAC accredited, physician-led provider of high-quality telehealth services, nurse triage, triage education, and software for telephone medicine. Their comprehensive triage solution includes integrated mobile access and two-way video capability. For more information visit www.triagelogic.com and www.continuwell.com or email support@triagelogic.com

Coronavirus and the Healthcare Call Center


LVM Systems

By Mark Dwyer

Healthcare call centers face unprecedented challenges in response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. At a time when efficient call processing is even more critical than usual, due to increased call volumes, call times have lengthened. Much is attributable to the plethora of misinformation individuals have readily available to them over the internet, via the media, and from family and friends. Now, not only do call center nurses need to calm the caller, they must correct the caller’s misunderstandings.

Add to this the pace at which medically valid updates occur. Triage call centers must keep up with the weekly, and sometimes daily, changes to the guidelines for handling possible COVID-19 calls.

COVID-19 has generated tremendous activity related to telehealth as a method of triaging and treating those who are infected. Given that COVID-19 symptoms can vary from very mild to severe and that the virus spreads through close contact, telehealth can be a powerful tool in combating the crisis.

Health center providers may now deliver in-scope services via telehealth to individuals who have not previously presented for care at a health center site and who are not current patients of the health center for the duration of this public health emergency. These include triage services with or without initial consultations. Some of the specific changes include:

  • Continuation of zero member liability (such as copays and cost-sharing) for care that is delivered via telehealth.
  • Any services provided virtually will be eligible for telehealth coverage.
  • All prior authorization requirements for telehealth services will be lifted for dates of service from March 17, 2020, through June 30, 2020.
  • Telehealth services may be delivered by providers with any connection technology to ensure patient access to care.
COVID-19 has forced healthcare to look at all aspects of its care delivery system. Click To Tweet

New Telehealth Policies Expand Coverage for Healthcare Services

Numerous states have taken steps to waive their requirement that a physician is licensed in the state to provide care to patients through their declarations of statewide emergency. More states are sure to follow.

According to Gregory A. Hood, MD, an internist in Lexington, Kentucky, who is on the advisory board of Medscape Business of Medicine, “The waiving of state licensure requirements should help ease a number of stress points of the current crisis in ways that benefit society.”

Healthcare providers, supported by states and payers, can leverage telehealth in ways not possible in previous epidemics to triage, diagnose, and treat patients while effectively protecting healthcare workers and reducing the spread of the disease. States that have broad authority as payers can play a crucial role in driving the use of telehealth as a method of treatment by implementing reimbursement policies that enable providers to offer virtual care services to patients.

Like many other aspects of the United States’ healthcare industry, when COVID-19 ends, the healthcare call center will never be the same. We will work smarter, more efficiently, schedule more creatively, and support more remote staff. We will embrace telehealth, tele-triage, and telemedicine with video calls, chat, and online physician consults.

More insurance companies will reimburse for online physician visits enticing more to participate. Triage call centers may also have more opportunities to work with EMS and police stations to help triage patients. Finally, data sharing will increase to the patient’s PCP into their EMR records or other approved endpoints. Data aggregation and reporting will enable call centers to analyze better yearly trends leading to heightened prediction and prevention of disease. 

COVID-19 has forced healthcare to look at all aspects of its care delivery system. May we all be the better for it. 

LVM Systems logo

Mark Dwyer is a veteran of the healthcare call center industry and serves as COO of LVM Systems.

Key Tips to Successfully Work from Home



Discover How to Effectively Work in a Home Office, Whether Long-Term or Short-Term

By Peter Lyle DeHaan, Ph.D.

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan

I recently celebrated twenty years of working from home. For the first year I divided my time between my home office and a traditional office. I followed that with a couple more years that included travel. But for the last sixteen years I’ve worked exclusively from home. It’s an ideal arrangement, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. In fact, I doubt I could ever return to a job that required me to go into an office to work each day.

Here are some of the key considerations to make a work-at-home scenario a success.

Workspace

A key element to effectively work from home is to have a dedicated workspace you can call your own. For me, an unused bedroom became my office. When I’m in my home office, I work. When I leave, I stop.

But not everyone has a spare room they can take over. If that’s the case, can you carve out a corner in another room? Can you make a room multifunctional, where it works as an office during office hours and serves as family space the rest of the time? Regardless, the goal is training yourself so that when you go to your office—whatever it may look like—you’re conditioned to work and not do anything else.

Distraction Free

Having a workspace without distractions is ideal, but it’s not always feasible. In that case, the goal is to reduce distractions is much as possible. Remove everything from your home office that you don’t need for work. This includes televisions, radios, and books. Delete games from your computer, as well as other programs that don’t facilitate work.

Many home workers buy a white noise machine, turn on a fan, or listen to instrumental music so they can tune out household activities that may occur as they’re trying to work. If you have an office door, close it. Post office hours in your work area. Then enforce them.

Expectations

Establish expectations with family and friends. When I began working at home, I told our young children that until 5 p.m. they were not to interrupt me for any reason unless they were sick or bleeding. That did the trick. Other family members were a bit harder to train, but the point is to insist that your family and friends respect your time in your home office as sacred and not assume you’re available for nonwork activities. This also means not answering your home phone or taking personal calls while you’re working.

Routine

Just as when you work in an office location and have a series of steps you do before work and after work, do the same for your home office. Though it’s quite feasible to do so, don’t work in your pajamas. It conditions you to not take work seriously or put forth your best effort.

Also, don’t eat meals or snacks in your office. Eat breakfast before you arrive, enjoy supper afterward, and leave your office for lunch. Doing so promotes focus, priority, and professionalism.

Tools

An effective office requires tools. First up is a fast and stable internet connection. I can’t think of a job you can do from home for long without internet access. Get the best that you can afford, and don’t let online access hinder your success when you work from home.

A slow or buggy computer is another detriment. Every second of delay or frustration at your computer provides time you’re not being productive. The seconds add up to minutes and minutes add up to hours. Again, get the best computer you can afford. Install all the same programs on your home computer as you have at the office. Don’t skimp.

Also look for tools that you may not use in your workplace office, such as Skype or Zoom so that you can connect with your coworkers as needed.

Schedule

If you’re work-at-home situation is direct contact center work, then your scheduler will tell you when to work. Easy-peasy.

For everyone else, establish your own schedule, just as you would in a workplace setting. You start at a specific time, end at a specific time, and take time out for lunch and breaks. The rest of the time you should be in your office working.

The converse of this is outside of your work schedule you should not be in your office working. This takes us to the final consideration.

Balance

We often talk about work-life balance. Though always a critical consideration, balance looms as an even bigger concern when you work and live in the same place. This means segregating your work from the rest of your life, even though both happen at the same location. Some people prefer the word compartmentalize: to place work in one mental compartment and your home life in another.

When done right, working from home can increase productivity, decrease stress, and improve your enjoyment of your work. Click To Tweet

Action Steps

If you suddenly find yourself working at home, put these tips into practice as soon as possible. Then you will experience a successful, enjoyable, and effective situation. 

If you’re planning to one day work at home, put these steps into place before you start. It will make all the difference.

When done right, working at home can increase productivity, decrease stress, and improve your enjoyment of your work. Though you might now be working at home as a temporary solution to a problem outside your control, you might find the results so beneficial that you want to turn working at home into a permanent scenario.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is the publisher and editor-in-chief of AnswerStat. He’s a passionate wordsmith whose goal is to change the world one word at a time.

1Call Offers Free Licensing to Customers and Advice in Response to COVID-19 Crisis


1Call-call center

1Call, a division of Amtelco, announced the offering of free licensing to their customers during COVID-19.

“1Call has recently expanded its mission statement, adding ‘It’s All About the Why,’ said Tom Curtin, president of Amtelco and their 1Call Healthcare Division. “This has been implemented company-wide to reaffirm the reasons why we do what we do through the original company motto created in 1976—to provide the most innovative solutions backed by the industry’s best customer support.”

1Call is offering free operator, supervisor, and call recording licenses to all customers to assist with the increased call volumes because of the COVID-19 virus. They are also advising their customers on how to leverage their existing 1Call solutions during this crisis. 

Examples include:

  • Implementing a work from home model using a concurrent licensing structure and free additional licensing offer
  • Creating new custom codes specific to COVID-19
  • Utilizing 1Call software’s inherent skills-based call routing tool to ensure specific calls go to the right operators
  • Producing new scripted workflows to help guide new operators through any scenario
  • Leveraging group messaging and mass notification capabilities, which references directory listings, on-call schedules, statuses, and preferred contact methods
  • Recording new automated greetings and pre-call announcements to guide callers to the appropriate departments
1Call, a division of Amtelco

1Call features a complete line of modular solutions specifically designed to streamline enterprise-wide healthcare communications, save an organization’s limited resources, and help them bring wellness to their patients and their bottom line. For more information visit 1Call.com and contact them at 800-225-6035 or info@1call.com.

Good Clinical Documentation and the Telephone Triage Nurse


TriageLogic

By Heather Jarvis

When it comes to documenting triage calls, there’s always a fine balance between effective communications and liability risk. Nurses want to—and need to—effectively communicate information and directions to patients and those who may see their notes after the call. However, triage nurses must also cover themselves when it comes to liability.

So, what elements make good call documentation? Here are three tips to make sure your calls are well documented.

There’s always a fine balance between effective communications and liability risk. Click To Tweet

1. Make Your Communication Clear

Read your notes out loud and ask yourself, would this make sense to anyone else who reads it? Have I used the appropriate words? Does it have a definitive beginning and end?

2. Make Your Communication Concise

Think about what your narrative will look like to others. This applies not only to the next caregiver but six months or a year later when your instructions may face review. Are your communications direct and to the point?

3. Make Your Communication Credible

Use appropriate terminology, punctuation, and abbreviations. Make sure that others would view your documentation as written by someone who is knowledgeable. Always stick to the facts. Avoid jargon or slang. If a patient says she has a tummy ache, put that information in quotes so it’s known these were the patient’s words. Nurse triage documentation is not the place for personal views.

Conclusion

It’s important to remember that a nurse is judged by a reasonable standard: what a reasonable nurse would have done under the same or similar circumstances. See the most recent guidelines and the benefits of protocols for both children and adult triage.

Every nurse wants to provide the best care, perfect care. But perfect care is not what the law requires. The law requires that a triage nurse provide reasonable care. Clear, concise, and credible documentation is always a best practice.

TriageLogic

Heather Jarvis is the communications and client engagement specialist at Triage Logic.

TriageLogic Offers Remote Patient Monitoring

TriageLogic announced it will apply its thirteen years of industry-leading phone triage experience in the emerging remote patient monitoring (RPM) market. As monitoring technologies continue to gain traction, the healthcare industry views RPM as a tool to help control the cost of care for those with chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure, COPD, asthma, and diabetes.

TriageLogic announced it will apply its thirteen years of industry-leading phone triage experience in the emerging remote patient monitoring (RPM) market. Click To Tweet

Monitoring devices collect large amounts of patient data—blood pressure, blood sugar, blood oxygen levels, heart rate, and more. Each device has its own data algorithm that flags abnormal conditions. Results from these devices are typically displayed on dashboards provided by the device company. A physician or their staff that’s monitoring multiple patients with multiple conditions would need to spend a significant amount of time reviewing every dashboard regularly. This is time taken away from face-to-face patient care.

“Digital health technology is sophisticated and has tremendous potential to help patients better manage their health,” said Ravi Raheja, M.D., TriageLogic medical director and CTO. “However, the amount of data that’s generated is vast. A medically trained professional must review the information and evaluate it in the context of the individual to determine the appropriate action. We have the history, experience, and trained nursing staff to review this data,” said Raheja.

TriageLogic is working with physicians and device companies to bridge the gap that exists between the mountains of data generated by health technology devices and the decisions that need to be made in support of better health.

All monitoring takes place behind the scenes and is seamless to patients. A patient simply uses their device as directed by their physician. TriageLogic’s registered nurses evaluate any alerts or deviations registered by the devices. The patient then receives a call from a TriageLogic nurse who will provide instructions for follow-up care. On January 1, 2020, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved reimbursement for some virtual care monitoring, opening the door for more patients to request RPM.

“Most physicians don’t have the time or resources to monitor dashboards for multiple devices,” said Raheja. “TriageLogic’s resources allow physicians to do what they’re best at—spend quality face-to-face time with those who truly need medical intervention. We work closely with each physician group to ensure we understand their preferences and custom care -plans for patients with chronic disease.”

TriageLogic

TriageLogic is a technology-based service provider of remote patient monitoring services and quality telehealth solutions, including comprehensive after-hours call center services and innovative online systems for use in institutional and private practice settings. TriageLogic provides patient call solutions for more than 9,000 physicians and helps manage the care of more than eighteen million individuals.

February/March 2020 Issue of AnswerStat

Read the February issue of AnswerStat, the information hub for healthcare contact centers.



Feature Content:

AS February 2020

Contact Center Preventive Health Promotion, by Traci Haynes
Contact Centers can promote preventive health to help individuals reach their health and wellness goals and keep healthcare costs down…. read more >>

Vital Signs: What Kind of Healthcare Coverage Do You Provide to Your Staff? by Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD
A key aspect of enabling call center staff to best meet the healthcare needs of callers is to start by making sure you best meet the healthcare needs of your staff.… read more >>

Vendor Spotlight on LVM
Discover what LVM can do now and will be able to do later this year…. read more >>

How to Build an Actionable and Strategic Patient Experience Plan, by Gary Druckenmiller
Today’s consumers expect seamless, personalized interactions from all businesses—including their healthcare provider…. read more >>

E-Cigarettes and Vaping, by David Thompson, MD
Telephone triage nurses should be ready to answer questions from concerned callers about e-cigarettes and vaping…. read more >>

Ten years ago: Integrating Answering Service with Nurse Triage, by Charu G. Raheja
A partnership between a triage center and an answering service can help improve patient care and satisfaction, enhance nurse satisfaction, and decrease costs…. read more >>

Industry News

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About AnswerStat
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