How Insurance Reimbursements Make Remote Patient Monitoring Profitable for Healthcare Organizations


TriageLogic

By Ravi K. Raheja, MD

The COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged healthcare organizations and physicians to adopt remote healthcare more readily, from telehealth visits to remote patient monitoring (RPM). The need to care for patients efficiently from their homes and to assess a potential serious health problem has ushered in the future of the industry. This improves patient outcomes and decreases morbidity and mortality. Reimbursement from commercial and government health insurers has made this shift financially possible for doctor’s offices and hospitals. 

According to a new report by McKinsey & Company, remote patient care will account for about $250 billion (about 20 percent) of what Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial insurers spend on outpatient, office and home health visits in the near future. Remote patient monitoring for chronic patients is part of this new, technological wave taking over healthcare to improve patient outcomes.

RPM devices track essential vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, blood glucose levels, oxygen saturation, and temperature. There are also RPM devices for weight, patient activity, and sleep. The kinds of devices are expanding and becoming more comprehensive all the time. Their goal is for doctors to be able to regularly monitor patient vitals for signs of change and be able to intervene before a patient presents a symptom that would lead them to seek care. This webinar explains the RPM model and how to non-clinical call centers can make the process efficient for doctors. 

Reimbursement for Remote Patient Monitoring

In 2017, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a two-year study on its Chronic Care Management program, which laid out how RPM saved Medicare millions of dollars, decreased hospital readmissions, and increased patient education about their chronic ailment. These key goals make up a broad picture of value-based care.

CMS expanded their support for RPM since the pandemic stirred up interest in remote care projects. CPT (current procedural terminology) codes are available to help doctor offices make RPM programs profitable while also improving patient care. These codes provide a financial structure for physicians to receive reimbursement for the time spent and the equipment used. 

As far as actual figures, on average, CMS approved reimbursements of $120 per patient per month. Thinking bigger, if fifty patients enroll in an RPM program, a doctor’s office can generate $72,000 a year in revenue. 

Provider and Hospital Benefits

In addition to the increase in revenue from current patients, it is important to consider how RPM can affect a practice’s patient base. Some statistics are eye-opening. Nearly 25 percent of people polled stated they would switch to a new physician to access telehealth. As remote care becomes the norm and patients begin to acclimate to new platforms, it’s worthwhile to consider if patients can be lost to practices who use RPM. Fifty-one percent of patients are in some way uncomfortable with in-office visits, in addition to 42 percent feeling uncomfortable going to a hospital for any medical treatment, and 45 percent feeling uncomfortable using an urgent care or walk-in clinic. 

There are even more cost-saving CPT codes which can maximize profits. There is a code for initial setup of the device and patient education. An additional code can be billed each thirty days for supplying the device. Twenty minutes or more of clinical staff time in a calendar month spent interacting or communicating with a patient is also reimbursed. Collection and interpretation of data brought in by the device and digitally stored or transmitted to a patient through the physician is another helpful CPT code. 

Implementing Remote Patient Monitoring 

Setting up an RPM platform is an investment towards the future. Strive to create an onboarding experience that is efficient with minimum provider time. For example, nurses can educate patients, and non-clinical staff can track device data.

TriageLogic


Ravi K. Raheja, MD is the COO and medical director of the TriageLogic Group. Founded in 2007, TriageLogic is a URAC accredited, physician-lead provider of high-quality telehealth services, remote patient monitoring, nurse triage, triage education, and software for telephone medicine. Their comprehensive solutions include integrated mobile access and two-way video capability. The TriageLogic group serves over 9,000 physicians and covers over 20 million lives nationwide.

1Call Announced Amtelco’s U.S. Patent for Auditing Communication Sessions


1Call, a division of Amtelco

1Call, a division of Amtelco, announced that Amtelco received a U.S. patent for “Auditing Communication Sessions.” Existing call center systems only allow rudimentary forms of call auditing, limited to a single method (such as listening to the communication session in mute-mode). If the communication occurs via text message, web chat, or electronic mail, call center managers can’t appraise the interaction. 

“The ability to audit different types of communication sessions helps to ensure that a patient’s experience with the hospital call center is satisfactory,” said Amtelco and 1Call president Tom Curtin. “A good patient experience is critical for both patients and a healthcare organization.”

Amtelco’s improved auditing enables hospital call center supervisors to assess communications from different platforms to help ensure a satisfactory patient experience. The healthcare industry asks patients to provide information about their care experience with a hospital via the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. Unacceptable survey outcomes can result in hospitals losing some reimbursements.

1Call Announces U.S. Patent for Speech-Enabled Scripting


1Call, a division of Amtelco

1Call, a division of Amtelco, announced that Amtelco received a U.S. patent for “Intelligent Speech-Enabled Scripting.” The patentable element is Amtelco’s system and method for intelligent speech-enabled scripting. 

This improved system eases the complexity and burdens that hospital call centers face with configuring multiple, separate devices to work effectively together to facilitate the handling of incoming calls, manage the variation in call loads, and provide adequate security measures to safeguard sensitive information conveyed during a call.

“Our call center scripting software helps to streamline enterprise-wide hospital communications and is fully customizable to efficiently guide operators through calls that help patients and medical staff with appointments, referrals, prescription renewals, scheduling, and emergencies, while helping to reduce operator errors. Speech-enabled intelligent scripting provides our customers with an efficient system to manage a productive healthcare call center,” said 1Call president Tom Curtin.

1Call, a division of Amtelco

The 1Call division of Amtelco is a leader in developing software solutions and applications designed for the specific needs of the healthcare call center marketplace. 1Call features a complete line of modular solutions specifically designed to streamline enterprise-wide communications, save an organization’s limited resources, and make them efficient, helping them bring wellness to their members and their bottom line. 

February 2021 Issue of AnswerStat

Read the February issue of AnswerStat, the information hub for healthcare contact centers.



Feature Content:

AS TOC February 2021

Remote Patient Monitoring and Nurse Triage, by Dr. Ravi Raheja
RPM is one of the fastest-growing medical technologies in healthcare, closely monitoring chronic patients in a safe, cost-effective manner. . . . read more >>

Vital Signs: Mixing Full-time and Part-time Call Center Staff, by Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD
Strategically hire full-time and part-time employees to achieve both stability along with much-needed flexibility. . . . read more >>

LVM Vendor Spotlight
LVM’s solutions support nurse triage, disease management, behavioral health intake, patient transfer, and referral/marketing services. . . . read more >>

How Hospital Contact Centers Support Emergency Departments During COVID-19, by Nicole Limpert
Healthcare call centers continue to use technology in fresh ways to assist patients and try to ease the strain on hospital emergency departments. . . . read more >>

4 Ways Healthcare BPO Partnerships Deliver, by Austin Ridgeway
Strong BPO partnerships build on the principles of lean operations, co-creation, design thinking, and globalization. . . . read more >>

Modernizing Your Contact Center: The First Step Toward a More Engaging Patient Experience, by Donna Martin
As the industry shifts toward a patient-centric, proactive model, business process management (BPM) providers can assist. . . . read more >>

Ten Years Ago: Healthcare and Outsourcing by Sandip Sen Make the relationship between healthcare and a BPO partner one of flexibility and understanding to provide the best experience for patients.. . . read more >>

Industry News

Amtelco Celebrates miSecureMessages
TriageLogic Releases Data on Remote Nurse Triage Calls
1Call Announces U.S. Patent for Speech-Enabled Scripting

Send us your healthcare call center news for consideration in the next issue of AnswerStat.

Marketplace Directory: AnswerStat Directory of leading Healthcare Contact Center vendors:

Ameridial healthcare solutions
Call 4 Health
Startel
American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN)
Pulsar360
Keona Health


About AnswerStat
AnswerStat is the information hub for healthcare contact center news and resources, published specifically for hospital and medical contact centers and distributed free to qualified readers, decision -makers, and influencers at hospitals and healthcare contact centers worldwide.

Contact us for more information.

Mixing Full-time and Part-time Call Center Staff



Discover the Right Balance in Agent Scheduling for Your Healthcare Contact Center

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan

By Peter Lyle DeHaan, Ph.D.

Some healthcare call centers only employ full-time staff. Others do the opposite and only hire part-timers. The ideal solution might be to balance a combination of both full-time and part-time agents.

Full-Time Call Center Agents

A key benefit of staffing your call center with full-time employees is greater stability and predictability. A full-time employee with benefits, especially healthcare benefits, is more likely to be committed to their work and less likely to seek a new job.

This commitment results in having an accomplished workforce that possesses the knowledge accumulated only through longevity. The typical result is more accurate communication with callers and the potential for better outcomes. With these as the benefits of having a full-time staff, why wouldn’t every call center want to hire only full timers?

Call centers with only full-time staff face a couple limitations. The key one is that call traffic seldom fits the nice 9-to-5 work schedule of full-time employees. Instead, callers arrive in predictable surges throughout the day. When attempting to address these traffic peaks with full-time staff working eight-hour shifts, the result is they will need to work like crazy some of the time and still not be able to keep up. At other times they won’t have enough to do.

Another limitation is a lack of flexibility. If a full timer’s shift is over, having worked there eight hours, but you need them to stay late to take more calls, you’re looking at an overtime situation. On the other hand, if you have people sitting around twiddling their thumbs, you can’t send a full-time employee home early because they won’t get there forty hours of work that you promised them and that they expect.

Part-Time Call Center Agents

As a reaction of this, other call centers hire only part-time staff. This gives them maximum scheduling flexibility. They’re able to have employees work exactly when they need them, no more and no less. If things get especially busy and you need someone to stay later, many are happy to pick up extra hours. Conversely, if it is slower than expected and you want to send staff home, there is usually someone anxious to accommodate.

Yet this maximum flexibility comes at a price. Part-time staff are less committed to you, your call center, and your callers. They’re more likely to look for other jobs that pay more, have better benefits, or offer more appealing schedules. They may desire full-time work and only accepted your offer because the hours you offered them were better than no hours.

This means that a call center of part-time employees has higher turnover, along with all the problems that the constant churn of employees can present.

Hybrid Staffing

The solution is to strategically hire full-time and part-time employees. This provides the best solution to achieve both a degree of stability along with much-needed flexibility. Though the ideal ratio of full-time to part-time workers varies from one call center to the next, a general initial goal is 50-50. That is to have a foundation of full-time employees filling half of your typical schedule, using part-time staffers for the remaining half.

In your actual operation, however, you may find it works better to have fewer full-time agents or have more, but you won’t know what the ideal ratio is and will have to home in on it over time.

Call center staffing is part art and part science, balancing your organization’s fiscal responsibility with your caller’s healthcare needs. A hybrid staff comprised of both full-time and part-time agents may be the best way to get there.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is the publisher and editor-in-chief of AnswerStat. He’s a passionate wordsmith whose goal is to change the world one word at a time.

Modernizing Your Contact Center: The First Step Toward a More Engaging Patient Experience



By Donna Martin 

While healthcare has traditionally been more reactive in nature, consumerism is driving a shift toward a model that is more proactive and puts patients at the center. As providers compete ever more fiercely for less revenue due to the financial crisis brought on by COVID-19, we fully expect to see a heavier focus on the consumerization of healthcare this year, and a major boost to patient experience as a result.

In fact, consumerism has already changed patient-facing communications for hospitals and health systems. This shift has been so major that many healthcare leaders are looking to other industries—such as banking and retail—to uncover best practices to adapt to the healthcare setting. After all, the people who shop at Amazon.com are the same people who shop for healthcare—and the experience of the former informs their expectations for the latter.

As a result of consumerism’s influence, delivering an exceptional patient experience is more important than ever, and first impressions are critical. That’s why a modernized contact center—measured by value-based benchmarks—is integral both for differentiating your healthcare organization and for preventing the loss of valuable customers.

For example, if a patient makes a basic inquiry, such as to schedule an appointment, ask a question about a treatment plan, or request a referral, are they confronted with a myriad of questions, outdated, legacy options, and poorly automated selection menus? Are they routed and rerouted among multiple call service operators and forced to relay the same information repeatedly? For a patient living in the gig economy and accustomed to a seamless customer experience, a painful interaction such as this isn’t likely to make a good first impression.

Contact centers measure quantitative benchmarks, such as how fast calls are answered, average handle time, the rate of first-call resolution, and the number of agent-to-agent transfers. All those measures are important, but these traditional, quantitative benchmarks fall short of the innovations and requirements of the industry’s transition to patient-centered, value-based care delivery.

Patient contact centers should offer seamless patient engagement, reducing frustration and time spent by caregivers and patients seeking answers to their questions. If airline carriers know their customers’ preferred seating arrangement and hotels know their guests’ floor and room preferences, then healthcare provider contact centers should strive to anticipate the needs of their patients in a much more proactive manner.

The shift toward an initiative-taking approach requires that patient records are in the patient portal and can be effectively routed to care coordinators. This allows agents to reference and make decisions based on what is known about that patient at that time, including personalization criteria, such as a patient’s preferred channel of communication.

Today’s consumers demand a healthcare ecosystem that offers self-service channels to help them get the right answer quickly. Provider organizations must invest in hyper-personalized, unified, and frictionless experiences with cross-channel integration to create a holistic and engaging patient experience. 

To support these modernized contact centers, health systems will turn increasingly to the next generation of data analytics and cognitive artificial intelligence (AI). Providers have a phenomenal amount of data at their disposal—from claims, labs, and other sources—but using it to effectively anticipate patient needs with razor-focused accuracy remains a challenge. 

From tracking and screening of biometrics and preventive care based on personalized data, organizations should deploy analytics to enhance personal profiles and gain a comprehensive understanding of how to best guide an individual’s health requirements. This will raise the bar on optimizing patient experience. 

As the industry continues to shift toward a patient-centric, proactive model, business process management (BPM) providers can assist with addressing these changes and shorten the learning curves that may exist. The fact that most BPMs have existing relationships with clients who have long emphasized customer experience, such as retail and e-tail, makes them the perfect resource to tap for providing guidance and implementing these new strategies.

Donna Martin is senior vice president, healthcare business development at HGS

LVM Vendor Spotlight


LVM Systems

During the past year, LVM Systems, a leading developer of desktop and web enterprise action solutions, announced the availability of three new product offerings: LVM One Desktop, LVM One Web, and Personal Health Valet. These solutions address all inbound inquiries, outgoing communication, and coordination assistance. 

LVM One Desktop

Utilizing a user interface (UI) professional’s expertise, LVM developed LVM One Desktop. This solution was designed around the principle of “Efficiency through Elegance.” Based on the Golden Ratio of 16:10, LVM One Desktop benefits from reducing contrast, strengthening focus points, and maximizing working memory.

LVM One Desktop’s simplified workflow improves call times by streamlining data entry. It also utilizes Microsoft’s newest recommended icons and fonts in conjunction with the following key features:

  • The ability for multiple transactions and modules to be open simultaneously.
  • A floating follow-up queue that is displayable on a second monitor.
  • Call templates to filter data by marketing campaign, disaster, or pandemic.

LVM One Web Solution

The LVM One Web solution is a lightweight, secure, and convenient way to handle contact center needs using unique workflows customized to meet your contact center’s most common activities. This solution:

  • Is accessible on a secure internet connection via a web browser, enabling the contact center representative to field requests for class registration, physician referral and appointment, triage, health information, and hospital transfer. 
  • Enables contact center representatives to monitor their active calls and follow-up queues, send direct messages to each other, pull system reports, and run “discoveries” on useful contact center information.

As additional solutions, LVM offers the following add-ons to either software: 

  • Chat, or bi-directional text* with consumers, patients, or providers for class registrations, physician referrals, triage, health information, service referrals, or respond to a question or other request.
  • Self-service portal access (WebLink+) for patients to class registrations, physician referrals, triage, health information, service referrals, or respond to a question or other request.
  • Enterprise access for non-contact center staff to view and manage select information such as class builds and rosters or physician files, or to run specified reports.

* Bi-directional text is only available with LVM One Web.

Personal Health Valet 

Personal Health Valet is a unique platform that allows hospitals to tailor automated campaigns to guide patients for optimized care. Personal Health Valet addresses strategic goals by creating a smart, trusted conversation channel for the patient and family circles. It fills communication gaps created by disparate hospital systems and manual processes by delivering an intelligent and fully automated platform for communicating with patients, spouses, and key employees in real-time.

Personal Health Valet also addresses the myriad of communication gaps that exist when patients leave the health system’s walls. This platform can seamlessly integrate asynchronous (technology-driven) and synchronous (staff-driven) conversations to expand the opportunity for success. 

Personal Health Valet can augment existing predictive technologies and processes with an actionable platform to target and help manage high-risk patient groups. Personal Health Valet:

  • Provides complete “Predictive Models” with actionable workflows. 
  • Creates intelligent post-discharge communication. 
  • Promotes patient compliance: meds, rehab, etc. 
  • Automates communication based on patient condition.
  • Reduces re-admits. 
  • Expands existing care management through technology.
  • Engages in bi-directional communication to keep managers in synch with target patients with CHF, pneumonia, joint replacement, and others.
  • Tracks whether patients have scheduled in-network specialty care visits ordered by primary care doctors.

In addition, Personal Health Valet identifies patients who have been to the ED more than once within the last twelve months for non-emergent conditions and sends them an automated message to alert them about the primary care or urgent care clinics closest to their zip code. It can redirect non-emergent cases from ER to Urgent Care Centers and decrease system leakage.

Overview

For over thirty years, LVM’s solutions have supported nurse triage, disease management, behavioral health intake, patient transfer, and referral/marketing services. The company’s cornerstones are comprehensive software, outstanding customer support, and proven clinical content supported by Drs. Barton Schmitt and David Thompson. 

The LVM team also provides custom web development, implementation services, on-site or remote training, phone and remote-access support, network consultation, free educational webinars, customization of screens, and custom reports. 

LVM Systems logo

For more information, contact LVM Systems at 480-427-3186. 

Remote Patient Monitoring and Nurse Triage


TriageLogic

By Dr. Ravi Raheja

Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) is on track to be the future of healthcare, especially as the number of chronic care patients and the cost of healthcare increases annually. RPM is the use of technology to gather patient health data from an individual. A clinic or nurse call center electronically evaluates the information. RPM is gaining traction by many in the medical field because it improves patient care. 

Many of these devices can capture data that a patient may not necessarily observe. These regular readings give meaningful data that can help providers see the bigger picture when it comes to a patient’s condition and outcome. 

This technology, usually in the form of a device that goes home with a patient, can monitor important health factors such as blood pressure, blood sugar, and respiratory rate. It allows doctors and clinicians to regularly check patient vitals before a patient even presents a symptom that would require an office visit. 

Remote triage nurses help monitor patient data and ensure patient safety. After the patient returns home with their device, these nurses monitor all health information from it. Non-clinical staff make sure patients use the device properly and call them back if the data is not coming in as expected. 

Nurses review patient data and contact patients if they see concerning data. They ask patients questions to determine if physician intervention is needed. They also provide additional information or ask questions based on individualized physician instructions. Non-clinical and clinical staff are a bridge from patient to doctor, and they alleviate the burden on the providers.

In the United States, six in ten adults suffer from some form of a chronic disease, such as obesity, diabetes, or heart disease. Chronic diseases are responsible for 75 percent of the 3.5 trillion dollars spent on healthcare each year. Overall, an estimated widespread adoption of remote patient monitoring could save the U.S. as much as $6 billion annually.

For doctors and medical organizations, this translates into improved patient care while at the same time giving providers the ability to increase their annual revenue per patient. 

First, the regular monitoring of patient vitals provides efficient scheduling of follow up visits when necessary based on abnormal readings. 

Second, CMS reimburses doctors for the cost of the RPM device and for the time it takes to monitor patient vitals. The reimbursement amount allows doctors to earn extra income each month even after considering the costs of outsourcing the monitoring. 

RPM is on the forefront of healthcare. With the ability to closely monitor chronic patients in a safe, cost-effective manner, RPM is one of the fastest growing medical technologies in the medical field. The goal is to help both patients and physicians by providing tools to improve care while decreasing the burden on physicians.

TriageLogic

Dr. Ravi Raheja is the medical director at TriageLogic.

How Hospital Contact Centers Support Emergency Departments During COVID-19


1Call, a division of Amtelco

By Nicole Limpert

Emergency departments (ED) in the United States began around 1880 as accident services provided through a workman’s compensation plan. Today, it’s common for healthcare organizations to have an ED within their hospital building, with dedicated staff that offers critical and indispensable care. Approximately 139 million Americans go to the emergency room each year. 

Typically, patients can visit the ED with any complaint, so medical staff need to prioritize cases based on clinical need using a process called triage. Triage is a brief assessment of the patient’s condition usually done in-person by a triage nurse. 

Even though most patients continue to receive care in the ED or are passed to another area of the hospital after triage, estimates show that approximately 32 percent of visits to EDs are non-urgent and can be treated during triage or in other care settings. 

Telephone Triage Nurses

Some healthcare systems provide nurse on-call hotlines and telephone triage nurses as part of their telehealth services. Patients who are unsure if their medical need is urgent enough for an emergency room visit can speak to a registered nurse on the phone. The triage nurse asks a series of questions to quickly assess the caller’s condition and give advice for minor complaints or recommend an ED visit for more serious concerns.

Nurses who work as contact center agents are part of a hospital’s comprehensive response to emergencies. They provide services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, just like a brick-and-mortar emergency department. Patients experience the additional convenience of receiving care remotely without having to travel.

In a study published in 2017, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that an EDs delivered 47.7 percent of all medical care in the United States. Helping non-critical patients in the comfort of their own homes also means more time can be dedicated to those who are experiencing an actual emergency.

COVID-19’s Impact on Hospitals

When the coronavirus pandemic began in early 2020, emergency departments in the United States experienced a six percent increase in patient visits. Some hospitals asked for support from their call center operators who were able to help relieve the burden of short-staffed departments by assisting patients with insurance, registration, and other services over the phone. 

As the virus spread, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) asked EDs to screen patients for COVID-19 in an effort to keep patients and medical staff safe. Many people became afraid to go to the emergency room despite the assurances of safety from healthcare organizations, resulting in a decreased in visits to the ED by more than 30 percent in April 2020.

Hospital’s began to postpone elective surgeries to free up space and supplies for treatment of COVID-19 patients. Various departments experienced a drastic decrease in patient visits and some hospital systems began to lay off staff.

Healthcare organizations were able to leverage their contact centers and train staff members, who would otherwise have been laid-off, to answer the ever-increasing calls to their call centers. 

“We were able to redistribute existing staff from other departments and tap into their skills to cross-train them to work for the switchboard,” said Shelley White, director of patient access services for State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University. “In our situation, patient access staff and medical answer teams were trained on easy calls and were then able to work from home as remote operators. These staff members are now even more valuable to our organization,” 

COVID-19’s Impact on Hospital Contact Centers

“We are experiencing extremely high call volume related to COVID-19 information and vaccine interest. Please understand that our phone lines must be clear for urgent medical care needs. We are unable to accept phone calls to schedule COVID-19 vaccinations at this time.” Messages like this one are appearing in banners at the top of many hospital websites.

Call volume related to COVID-19 information has been overwhelming. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) advises to, “Establish a coordinated call center system to divert non-emergency calls from a community’s 911 system, and non-critically ill patients away from the emergency healthcare system. A coordinated call center system allows multiple agencies and organizations to share the high load of calls during a pandemic by integrating components of those organizations such as call centers, information lines, and crisis centers.”

Hospital contact centers help in this endeavor by establishing hotlines in their region. Jennie McWhorter, IS operations manager for Ephraim McDowell Health in Danville, KY said, “Our call center agents are also the hub of our COVID-19 hotline. The community can dial the number they already know and get the updated information they need through our 24/7 operators.” 

Healthcare call centers continue to use technology in new ways and pivot when needed to assist patients and try to ease the strain on hospital emergency departments. Shelley White stated, “Our call center software has given us so much flexibility to keep up with this ever-changing COVID-19 crisis. We are able to smooth workflow peaks and valleys and went from being overwhelmed with calls at the beginning of this situation, to having improved call metrics.”

1Call, a division of Amtelco

Nicole Limpert is the marketing content writer for Amtelco and their 1Call Healthcare Division. Amtelco is a leading provider of innovative communication applications. 1Call develops software solutions and applications designed for the specific needs of healthcare organizations.

Amtelco Celebrates Misecuremessages


1Call, a division of Amtelco

1Call, a division of Amtelco, is celebrating the 10-year anniversary and continued growth of miSecureMessages, their secure messaging app. 

The HIPPA and HITECH-compliant miSecureMessages helps hospitals and clinics unify their communications and streamline care team coordination by enabling staff to easily share texts, photos, audio files, and videos for secure, accurate communication while protecting electronic patient health information (ePHI). The app also integrates with existing hospital alert software to help reduce notification time when an emergency code occurs. 

“MiSecureMessages is more than just an encrypted texting app,” said Tom Curtin, president of Amtelco and 1Call. “Our app can seamlessly integrate with an organization’s nurse call system and other alert software to expedite emergency code notifications. Hospital call center operators use miSecureMessages to contact on-call staff. Maintenance crews can take a photo or video of a building issue and collaborate to address it. Housekeeping uses it for bed management to quickly inform intake that a bed is ready for a new patient, which improves their bed turnover rate. And lab personal and radiologists use it to promptly communicate critical results.”

1Call, a division of Amtelco

Learn more at misecuremessages.com and 1call.com.

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