Is BPO a Key Enabler in the Push for Better Patient Outcomes?

By Anand Natampalli

In the emerging value-based world, healthcare providers and payers increasingly align incentives to drive improved patient health outcomes, more patient-centric services, and reduced medical cost for individuals. BPO (business processing outsourcer) service providers can bring a neutral consultative perspective, with design thinking and innovation, to meet the provider’s complex challenges.

To solve individual provider’s specific needs, BPO organizations bring customized solutions using a service incubation approach. It incorporates the following:

  • A new breed of patient engagement and experience solutions, with a consolidated, targeted strategy
  • Data management and integration, sharing intelligence from different segments of the collective healthcare ecosystem, including payers, providers, pharmaceutical companies, and durable medical equipment (DME) providers
  • Process optimization through automation and analytics, with a population health management (PHM) focus

A New Breed of Patient Engagement and Experience

Often, consumers of healthcare services encounter confusing phone directories, difficult-to-navigate-websites, and representatives who may not have the training or resources to make a patient encounter meaningful and productive. One of the most critical areas where BPOs can contribute is by helping provider organizations improve the patient experience and drive better health outcomes.

With the added patient choice in today’s marketplace, patient engagement, and experience—an area traditionally of lesser importance to health systems—is now critically paramount to attracting and retaining patients, driving healthier outcomes, and achieving higher ratings.

Patient engagement and experience is often a critical missed opportunity for provider organizations of all sizes. Patient access centers are legitimate business departments and have an important role to play in the transition to value-based, patient-centric care. They have the potential to create new streams of revenue. They engender patient brand loyalty. Most importantly, access centers are a critical first impression that ultimately determines whether a patient chooses to purchase healthcare services.

In a patient-centric healthcare economy, BPOs offer the right balance of technology and talent for seamless, patient-experience delivery. BPOs play an effective front-line role to drive revenue and patient satisfaction, reduce no-shows, and eliminate the need for patients to fish around for answers to their questions. These partners can more effectively employ their analytics and automation expertise to make the patient experience as easy as possible through both personalization and self-service—striving for that perfect balance between automated bots and live, human-touch interaction.

Data Management and Integration

In the new healthcare landscape, PHM is a key area of focus for providers. According to a May 2017 Deloitte Center for Health Solutions survey of hospital CEOs, population health analytics investment is the highest-rated analytics priority for healthcare organizations.

The amount of data attached to every patient has grown exponentially. This must be gathered, integrated, and interpreted according to compliance guidelines and processes that can vary widely between payers and providers. Additionally, the datasets held by payers and providers can be different. For example, payers possess data on claims, financial analytics, and risk models. Providers have administrative and clinical data that includes case histories and outcomes.

BPOs with both payer and provider expertise can best assist, by bridging the data gap between these two organizations. For example, BPOs not only have claims data from provider groups but also from payers. By leveraging this comprehensive information, providers have a better, more holistic view of patient health. Armed with this intelligence, providers can positively affect a patient’s health outcomes, through PHM processes that also bend the cost curve.

Further to this point, each data set is valuable, but in isolation it doesn’t provide a holistic and contextual perspective of the patient. Providers need to leverage health plan data to move from episodic care to delivering outcomes-based care across the care continuum. Payers need access to patient information to work with providers to establish appropriate care plans for their members. Again, this is where BPOs bridge the gap for providers, as well as payers.BPOs offer the right balance of technology and talent for seamless, patient-experience delivery. Click To Tweet

Automation and Analytics with a PHM Focus

With better patient engagement and data integration to leverage PHM, there is an ideal scenario for best use of automation and analytics. BPO partners can bring the requisite advanced automation and analytics, as key drivers of business improvements or process changes. With more understanding and awareness of the data coming downstream, BPOs know how to analyze these data points and decouple nonessential activities with automation for a positive impact on health outcomes and to drive costs down.

They also can offer “automation and analytics as a service,” relieving organizations of the capital and time investment of developing these abilities in house. Today’s cognitive computing capabilities will affect more complex, judgement-based activities (like origination and underwriting) with compliance objectives, too. Agility, speed, and accuracy are all positive customer satisfaction results derived from these transformations. Most impactful may be the automation data and applied analytics that will dramatically improve outcomes, for more forward-thinking strategies.

Conclusion

Today, BPO partners take an active role in helping provider organizations manage change, internally and externally. This puts them in a better position to take advantage of the opportunities found by optimizing patient experience journeys. By selecting the right partner, hospitals and health systems can position themselves to gain a competitive advantage in the present, while setting themselves up for an even brighter future.

Anand Natampalli is a senior vice president, global business development, for HGS, a provider of end-to-end business process services for numerous Fortune 100 health insurance companies and large provider organizations.

The February/March 2018 Issue of AnswerStat

Read the February issue of AnswerStat, the information hub for healthcare contact centers.


LVM Systems


Feature Content:

Telephone Triage Research: Right Staff, Right Stuff¸ by Sheila Quiler Wheeler

With telephone triage, the challenge is to get the patient to the right place, at the right time, for the right reason. This research on telephone triage decision-making safety and system research provides key insight into how to best accomplish these telephone triage goals… read more >>

Vital Signs: Voice AI in the Healthcare Call Center, by Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD

With AI and machine learning, the potential exists for an intelligent interface to provide the conversational bridge between patients and triage protocols… read more >>

Vendor Spotlight on LVM Systems
LVM Systems Celebrates 30th Anniversary
Throughout LVM’s history, three critical components come to mind: providing comprehensive, efficient software; using recognized, quality clinical content; and building positive relationships with clients across all company departments…  read more >>

Guest Column: Answering Services Can Help Medical Clinics Do More for Less, by Janet Livingston
Answering services that integrate with clinics’ EMR systems and provide sophisticated smart phone integration distinguish themselves from other less-equipped providers… read more >>

Ten years ago: Pairing Nurse Triage with Medical Answering Service, by Ken Bleakley
After-hours telephone services for physicians must be able to address both administrative questions and clinical concerns from patients. Both physician and patient need to be confident that all inquiries will receive a prompt, caring, and authoritative response. This requires the deployment of two different skill sets: medical answering service and registered nurse triage… read more >>

Industry News:

Call4Health      TriageLogic

1Call      Startel

TeamHealth Medical Call Center      Ambs Call Center

AAACN       Citra Health Solutions

Call Center Sales Pro, providing proven healthcare call center solutions      Pulsar360


About AnswerStat
AnswerStat is the information hub for healthcare contact center news and resources, published specifically for hospital and medical contact centers and distributed free to qualified readers, decision makers, and influencers at hospitals and healthcare contact centers worldwide.

For more information, email Peter DeHaan.

Answering Services Can Help Medical Clinics Do More for Less


Call Center Sales Pro, providing proven healthcare call center solutions


By Janet Livingston

 Everyone in healthcare knows the key challenges the industry faces: do more, do it better, and do it for less. These pressures confront healthcare providers, coming from both the insurance companies that reimburse them and the patients that they serve.

But how can providers achieve these objectives of doing more, doing it better, and doing it for less, when these goals run counter to each other? Finding a solution requires innovative thinking and doing things in new ways.

Enter the venerable telephone answering service. Today, leading answering services are stepping up to this challenge.

For decades answering services have provided telephone support to the healthcare community by answering calls, taking messages, and dispatching emergencies. They’ve done this afterhours and 24/7. When it comes to supporting medical clinics and healthcare practices, answering services can do these things. But they can also do much more.

Two Key Considerations

EMR Integration: One key way to make your answering service invaluable to a medical clinic or healthcare facility is to integrate your answering service platform with their EMR (electronic medical record) system. This allows you to automatically transfer the information you gathered from the clinics’ patients to the clinics’ EMR platform.

Without this capability, one of two things will occur. Either someone will need to manually rekey the information, or the information will forever remain isolated. Neither scenario is a good one.

The first instance requires hours of labor each day to reenter the information. Plus, as with any manual process, there’s a chance of data-entry errors. This will then put into question the reliability of the information and reflects badly on your answering service, even though the problem occurred after the data left your facility.

In the other scenario, though you’ve provided important information to the clinic, it’s of little value to them because it sequestered in an isolated database that’s not integrated with their main systems.

This is why EMR integration is so critical. Any answering service that can provide it distinguishes themselves from the competition. Plus, grateful clinics will form long-term relationships with their answering service because they don’t want to lose this valuable feature.

Smart Phone Integration: Virtually everyone in healthcare carries a smart phone (and sometimes more than one). This mobile technology has become indispensable in today’s business world, including the healthcare industry.

Leading answering services offer a data portal to their clients. This portal provides a powerful tool to access their account and the information in it. The next step is extending this functionality to the smart phone, such as with Amtelco’s miTeamWeb. This and other similar products enable answering service clients to review their answering service information, make updates, and manage their account at any time, from anywhere, using a smart phone app. This puts control of answering service accounts literally in the hands of its clients.

These apps work great out of the box and require little configuration for basic functionality. However, the most powerful answering service apps allow for customization in how the information is displayed, as well as to create widgets to accomplish specialized tasks and enhanced integrations.

For all its value and power, creating the widgets—especially the more complicated ones—requires technical knowledge and carries the need for programming skills. Not every answering service can do this, but those who can provide tremendous value to their clients.

Again, this enhanced service offering distinguishes one answering service from most others. It allows an answering service to better serve its clients in ways that the competition can’t match.

Conclusion

Most answering services can work for medical clinics and healthcare facilities. However, answering services that integrate with clinics’ EMR systems and provide sophisticated smart phone integration distinguish themselves from other less-equipped providers.

Which type of answering service do you want to be?

 Call Center Sales Pro, a full-service healthcare call center consultancyJanet Livingston is the president of Call Center Sales Pro, a premier consultancy and service provider for healthcare call centers and answering services. Contact Janet at contactus@callcenter-salespro.com or call 800-901-7706.

Vendor Spotlight: LVM Systems Celebrates 30th Anniversary


LVM Systems


LVM Systems continues to evolve within the dynamic healthcare industry. Now, thirty years since its inception, hundreds of call centers, thousands of users, and millions of calls have established LVM as a leading provider of healthcare call center software solutions. LVM’s Centaurus software is the industry’s product of choice.

This year, as LVM celebrates its thirtieth anniversary, it reflects on its humble beginnings in the garage of Les Mortensen. Then only one man with an idea, today LVM operates from its two-building complex in Mesa, AZ.

Over the years, LVM has added new products while implementing hundreds of changes and enhancements to its flagship Centaurus software in response to its clients’ needs. Through it all, LVM has stayed true to its mission: helping healthcare call centers help patients.

This year, LVM’s development focus turned to cyber-security. With the ever-increasing number of cyber-attacks on personal health information (PHI), heightened security became critical. Numerous enhancements in LVM’s 2018 release of Centaurus relate to strengthening security safeguards.

Here are a few of the security changes:

  • Protected key fields from viewing until clicking the field. When clicked, the field displays, and a log is written noting the user that viewed the information.
  • Included a site level default that defines the required minimum length of passwords, along with the number of upper and lower-case letters, numeric values, and special characters allowing clients to follow their internal standards.
  • Upgraded credential system to modern best practices.
  • Enabled user accounts can expire on a particular date, making the user unable to log in to Centaurus.
  • Added the ability to lock a user’s record when the user exceeds the allowed number of failed login attempts. A user with manager authorization can unlock their user record.
  • Upgraded handling of passwords to store previous password hashes to prevent re-use.
LVM’s continued growth throughout its 30-year history is built upon providing comprehensive, efficient software, using recognized, quality clinical content, and building positive client relationships. Click To Tweet

Other recent enhancements include:

  • Centaurus authorized users can now create custom screen views from a “clean slate” to include only the fields used, greatly simplifying the screen presentation.
  • A web-based chat product, set up on the client’s website, allows a patient to engage and start a chat with the contact center.
  • Profiles display dynamically as a user views them. This way, the user always sees the most current data.
  • A national provider ID field now appears on the physician search screen.

In addition, LVM has updated its iCentaurus program to allow call centers to provide to select organizations the ability to set-up and maintain their physician and class profiles from remote locations via the web. A set of client-defined rules directs how the profile data is stored within N-Centaurus. Now, physician office managers and class instructors can be responsible for keeping their respective physician and class profiles current.

Capitalizing on the improvements in cellular phones’ ability to send photos and videos via the internet, Centaurus now supports a patient sending a photo or video of the reason prompting their triage call to the call center triage nurse. Centaurus saves the photo or video to the patient’s file making it available for inclusion in the patient’s EHR or paper chart. This allows the call center triage nurse to use an otherwise missing critical tool of triage: visual assessment.

LVM’s Centaurus healthcare call center solutions offer advanced nurse triage functionality, along with a full array of physician referral, class and membership management, patient transfer, behavioral health intake, a co-morbidity care management program, and marketing and CRM capabilities. Centaurus is available installed on-site or run as SaaS hosted by LVM at one of its two data centers.

When reflecting upon how LVM has continued to grow throughout its 30-year history, three critical components come to mind: providing comprehensive, efficient software; using recognized, quality clinical content; and building positive relationships with clients across all company departments.

For more information or a demonstration of LVM’s call center solutions, please contact Carol Zeek, regional VP, sales at 480-633-8200 x279 or Leann Delaney, regional VP, sales at 480-633-8200 x286.

LVM SystemsMark Dwyer is a 32-year veteran of the healthcare call center industry. He has been with LVM Systems since 2003.

1Call Announces Hashtag #How1CallHelps for HIMSS18 Theme

1Call, a division of AmtelcoThe 1Call Division of Amtelco announced the use of a special hashtag, #How1CallHelps, to fit the HIMSS18 theme, “Where the World Connects for Health” to act as an anchor for eight core messages it will feature at the show.

Attendees can use the #How1CallHelps hashtag to learn about 1Call’s role in helping healthcare organizations with code calls, directories, disaster preparedness, notifications, on-call scheduling, operator consoles, scripted workflows, and secure texting.

1Call will have two booths at HIMSS18: a primary booth at #4039 and another featuring the miSecureMessages secure texting app at #7308.

“1Call is looking forward to another successful conference,” said Mike Friedel, 1Call senior vice president of sales. “We have continued to develop secure and useful communications solutions for professional healthcare organizations. Year after year these organizations visit the 1Call booths to help their organization become more efficient, profitable, customer-centric, and more successful overall.”

Hospitals and clinics consistently report that using 1Call’s enterprise-wide communication solutions leads to improved patient satisfaction, reduced operator training times, fewer communication errors, and increased productivity.

For more information, contact 1Call at 800-225-6035, info@1call.com, or www.1call.com.

Voice AI in the Healthcare Call Center



Should We Embrace Technology in Our Medical Contact Centers or Fear It?

 By Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD

Peter DeHaan, Publisher and Editor of AnswerStatThroughout the history of the call center industry we’ve looked for ways to help our agents be more effective. In the pre-computer days this often meant physical solutions and electromechanical devices that allowed staff to answer calls faster, record information easier, and organize data more effectively.

Then came rudimentary computers that provided basic call distribution and CTI (computer telephony integration). Computer databases allowed us to retrieve information and store data. Following this we experienced voicemail, IVR (interactive voice response), and automated attendant. More recently we’ve encountered speech-to-text conversion and text-to-speech applications. Then came the chatbots, computerized automatons that allow for basic text and voice communication between machine and people.

Computers are talking with us. Smart phones, too. Consider Siri, Alexa, and all their friends. Technology marches forward. What will happen next?

I just did an online search for Voice AI. Within .64 seconds I received two million results. I’m still working my way through the list (not really), but the first few matches gave me some eye-opening and thought-provoking content to read and watch.

In considering this information, it’s hard to determine what’s practical application for our near future and what’s theoretical potential that might never happen. However, my conclusion is that with advances in chatbot technology, artificial intelligence (AI), and machine learning, we aren’t far from the time when computer applications will carry on full, convincing conversations with callers, who will think they’re talking with real people.

While many pieces of this puzzle are available today, I submit that we’re not yet to the point where we can have a complete, intelligent dialogue with a computer and not know it. But it will happen. Probably soon.  With AI and machine learning, the potential exists for an intelligent interface to provide the conversational bridge between patients and triage protocols. Click To Tweet

What Does Voice AI Mean for the Medical Call Center?

Voice AI in the Healthcare Call CenterJust like all technological advances since the inception of the earliest call centers, we’ll continue to free agents from basic tasks and allow them to handle more complex issues. Technology will not replace agents, but it will shift their primary responsibilities.

Or maybe not.

With the application of voice AI, might we one day have a call center staffed with computer algorithms instead of telephone agents? I don’t know. Anything I say today will likely seem laughable in the future. Either I will have overstretched technology’s potential or underestimated the speed of its advance.

I think I’m okay talking to a computer program to make an appointment with my doctor. And it wouldn’t bother me to call in the evening and converse with a computer as I leave my message for the doctor, nurse, or office staff. However, what concerns me just a tad would be calling a telephone triage number and having a computer give me medical advice.

Yet in considering the pieces of technology available to us today, this isn’t so far-fetched. Proven triage protocols are already defined and stored in a database. Giving them a computerized voice is possible now. And with AI and machine learning, the potential exists for an intelligent interface to provide the conversational bridge between me and the protocols. And this could be the solution to our growing shortage of medical practitioners.

For those of you actually doing telephone triage, you might be laughing right now. Perhaps you’re already implementing this. Or maybe you’re convinced it will never work.

Yet it’s important that we talk about technology and its application in healthcare call centers. Regardless of what happens, the future will certainly be an interesting place.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is the publisher and editor-in-chief of AnswerStat. He’s a passionate wordsmith whose goal is to change the world one word at a time.

Telephone Triage Research: Right Staff, Right Stuff



By Sheila Quiler Wheeler

Broadly speaking, telephone triage is a form of pre-hospital clinical care, albeit by phone. All clinical care implies a standardized approach and system components, similar to any other clinical subspecialty.

Telephone Triage Decision-Making Safety Research

The task of telephone triage involves assessing symptoms of invisible patients with a range of emergent to non-acute symptoms. As telephone triage clinicians we must insure the safe, timely assessment, and disposition of patient symptoms via the phone. Our challenge is to get the patient to the right place, at the right time, for the right reason.

In 2013, I authored a review of literature on telephone triage with a team of experts. We found that patient safety is a persistent topic in telephone triage research. Reviews of past research did not differentiate between clinicians’ and non-clinicians’ respective safety.

For example, four groups of decision makers—both clinician and non-clinician—perform aspects of telephone triage: physicians (clinician), nurses (clinician), emergency medical dispatchers/EMD (non-clinician), and clerical staff (non-clinician). We compared the four groups, reviewing studies between 2002 and 2012, looking for evidence of safety: complete systems and safe dispositions—that is, timely access to appointments.

Safety is likely related to the clinical expertise of the decision maker. While clerical staff and EMDs were not found to be safe, nurses had the highest percentage of safe dispositions, followed by physicians. While telephone triage nurses have minimal systems, traditionally, physicians have little or no training, telephone triage guidelines, or standards; frequently they do not document calls.

When compared to nurses, physicians’ practices appear to not have significantly evolved since the 1950s. Many experts believe that physicians’ practices will not likely change soon. Yet, telephone triage is rapidly growing, requiring expanded patient access and increased formalization. Thus, we believe the best approach is to focus research exclusively on nurse-staffed clinical call centers and to explore ways to improve their systems. Our challenge is to get the patient to the right place, at the right time, for the right reason. Click To Tweet

Telephone Triage System Research

In 2016, I conducted an informal online survey of RNs visiting teletriage.com. The survey explored RNs general perceptions of the quality and safety of system components: standards, training, guidelines, and EMR. Respondents to this anonymous survey were encouraged to be candid. Results of the 132 respondents are combined (36 were managers/administrators and 96 were staff nurses).

My purpose was to get a general idea about clinicians’ perceptions of safety and quality of telephone triage system components. Although the survey was informal and small, there were some interesting results, discussed below. Clearly, after fifty years, there is still a need for improved system components and training in telephone triage.

Type of Facility: The largest number of respondents worked in clinics and offices. It was surprising that hospitals were ranked second, followed by clinical call centers. It is unclear where exactly in hospitals telephone triage is taking place.

Populations Served: Most nurses served both pediatric and adult ages. A small number served pediatric populations exclusively.

Standards Usage: Most respondents had standards for telephone triage; the quality is unknown.

Type of Training: Most respondents had some training, with the majority having on-the-job training, and thirty-six having on-site training. Six respondents had no training. Training appears to be variable in content and quality.

Training Quality: Respondents ranked training quality as excellent: 29; above average, 43; average, 44; fair, 7; or poor, 3. Training content is unknown—whether in clinical decision-making or operation of electronic softwarethe first being a clinical skill and the second a technological skill.

Type of Guidelines: Respondents use electronic only, 59; both paper and electronic, 32; paper only, 33; or no guidelines at all, 8. Minimally, every facility should have at least paper guidelines.

Consistent Use of Electronic Guidelines: Respondents used electronic guidelines all the time, 49; most of the time, 36; half the time, 3; or rarely, 3.

Electronic Guideline User Friendliness: Respondents ranked electronic guidelines user friendly all the time, 15; most of the time, 66; half of the time, 7; occasionally, 2; or never, none.

EHR User Friendliness: Respondents found the EHR as user friendly all the time, 13; most of the time, 61; and half the time, 9.

Telephone Triage Outcomes

Given the conditions of uncertainty and urgency in our practice, it is concerning that malpractice cases still often involve the following failures and system error:

  • Use of clinically unqualified staff to assess symptoms
  • Failure to speak directly to the patient
  • Inadequate preliminary assessments
  • Inadequate documentation
  • Inadequate training

The survey summarized above presents rudimentary evidence of existing system failures, which is defined as “Failures of systems, processes, or conditions—intended to prevent errors from occurring—that might lead people to make mistakes.” Identified system errors include “wrong person, wrong task,” “Wrong match of plan to problem,” or “Failure to use any plan” to prevent error (Institute of Medicine). What’s needed is to provide quality guidelines, quality training, or complete system components.

It is reasonable to assume that, at a minimum, safety (good outcomes) begins with using qualified staff that is supported by a complete system: What is a system? A set of detailed methods, procedures, and routines formulated to carry out a specific activity or solve a problem. Donabedian defines quality as structure and process that results in safe, quality outcomes.

Structure: Quality System Components

  • Qualified staff in adequate numbers 
  • Training program
  • Guidelines
  • Standards
  • Documentation

The Nursing Process

  • Assessment
  • Working Diagnosis
  • Plan
  • Evaluation

Outcomes: Safe outcomes are timely, that is, coming early or at the right time.

  • At the right time
  • In the right place
  • For the right reason (See 5-Tier Triage)

Right Staff and Right Stuff

If a malpractice lawsuit occurs due to patient death or harm, telephone triage expert witnesses will request to review the following components of your system:

  • Guidelines
  • Training materials
  • Job qualifications and description
  • Standards (policies and procedures)
  • Call documentation (EMR)

Two initial recommendations based on these research projects are:

  1. Clinicians should manage symptom-based calls: Using non-clinicians to manage symptom-based calls may produce an unintended consequence of error. In the interest of safety, we recommend that nurses or other clinicians take symptom-based calls directly.
  2. Improve current nurse-staffed clinical call centers: While more complete, clinical call centers still need improvement: formal standardized training and improved call center and practice standards. To date, no independent peer-reviewed research has shown electronic decision support software to be reliable or valid. Some researchers have found that nurses are not actually using the electronic guidelines as instructed. The study indicated that, even when using guidelines, nurses still under referred 10 percent of patients.

Since 1984, Sheila Quilter Wheeler, RN, MS has pioneered the field of telephone triage through guideline development, conference development, research, expert witness, and consulting work. Her company, TeleTriage Systems, is located in San Anselmo, CA

Software to Triage and Document Patient Calls Updated with Detailed Reporting Capabilities and Custom Orders

TriageLogic introduced the latest version of MyTriageChecklist®, a daytime telephone nurse triage software to triage and document patient phone calls. This upgrade includes new features with data analytics reports and the ability for providers to customize the care instructions their nurses give during triage calls.

MyTriageChecklist now includes the ability to create custom reports. The new analytics feature allows practices to easily evaluate and monitor their clinical patient phone calls. They can see in real time the results of patient calls, including protocols used, disposition, and outcomes.

Another feature of the new myTriageChecklist is the ability to create custom orders. With this technology, once the nurse has determined the appropriate level of care, they can follow tailored instructions based on physician or practice preferences. For example, some doctors prefer their patients use specific brands of medications when appropriate. Other examples include a specific urgent care center or ER to go to if patients need immediate treatment. This option allows the nurse to help patients without having to consult with the doctor on every call. Highlights include:

  • Nurse triage protocols from Schmitt-Thompson, daytime and after-hours
  • Fast, efficient point and click interface
  • Medication dosage charts: click to add to triage documentation
  • Email/text handouts and encounter specific care advice to callers
  • Smart copy and paste to EMR
  • Preconfigured to work seamlessly inside Salesforce

Training to use the myTriageChecklist telephone triage software takes thirty minutes or less. A nurse manager gives personalized training for every group that signs up. The software is web based, meaning that no hardware or IT support is needed. These new features make it easy for any organization to set up and maintain a quality clinical call program.

TriageLogicFounded in 2005, TriageLogic is a URAC accredited, physician-led provider of quality services and software for telehealth. They integrate communication solutions with medical expertise based on practical experience and a thorough understanding of the field. TriageLogic is a leading provider of triage technology, mobile applications, and call center solutions. The TriageLogic group serves physicians nationwide and covers millions of lives. With over ten years of experience and six customizable products, TriageLogic continues to partner with private practices, hospitals, and corporations throughout the U.S. Visit www.triagelogic.com for more information

Call Center Sales Pro Hires Pete Gilhooly as Director of Hospital Call Centers

Telecom veteran brings 15 years’ experience in healthcare vertical to Call Center Sales Pro

Call Center Sales Pro, a full-service healthcare call center consultancyCall Center Sales Pro, a leading healthcare call center consultancy, announced that Pete Gilhooly joined their team as director of hospital call centers. In this new position he will work to finetune and rollout the organization’s operational model for hospital call centers. His first day in this new assignment was December 18, 2017.

Gilhooly will work with hospital call centers in the healthcare vertical and build upon the great strides already made by the Call Center Sales Pro team in this dynamic and growing sector.

Janet Livingston, founder of Call Center Sales Pro, brought Gilhooly on board to further advance the company’s already successful efforts in this market. “Pete is a natural fit with the Call Center Sales Pro team,” Livingston said. “He brings three decades of telecom leadership experience to us, the last fifteen of which focus specifically on healthcare.” By adding Pete’s leadership, knowledge, and expertise, “Call Center Sales Pro is poised to take a giant leap forward.”

“I’m happy to be part of the Call Center Sales Pro team,” Gilhooly said. “I look forward to much success as we grow the organization and bring the healthcare vertical to the next level. I’m really looking forward to this and all the exciting opportunities it entails.” In his new role, Pete will integrate the current initiatives of the Call Center Sales Pro team and use it to develop a comprehensive model that can be rolled out to hospital call centers across the United States.

In addition to spending thirty years in the telecom industry, with the last fifteen focused on healthcare, Gilhooly spent six years at Glens Falls Hospital, most recently as senior director of IT infrastructure. Gilhooly also worked at Chaplin Valley Physicians Hospital as director of information technology and at Albany Medical Center as vice president of technology management.

Call 4 Health Call Center Opens Third Facility

Call 4 Health, a leading medical call center and nurse triage service, opened a third location in Spring Hill, TN. Headquartered in Delray Beach, FL, it also operates a center in Linthicum Heights, MD.

“The demand for call center services in the medical industry has exploded in recent years,” said Joseph Pores, Call 4 Health CEO.” With this new facility, we will be able to greatly increase our volume and bring our proprietary, innovative technology to even more hospitals and medical centers around the country.”

The expansion includes the procurement of a 15,000 square feet facility, which will house 200 call center agents and triage nurses.

Call 4 Health uses state-of-the-art technology initiatives, and currently processes up to 30,000 calls daily for 1,400 clients, creating a solution to the demand put on large health systems and hospitals. Call 4 Health serves clients nationwide in almost every state. Eighty percent of its clients are hospitals and healthcare systems, with the remaining 20 percent in homecare, hospice, and pharmaceuticals.

With the addition of the Spring Hill facility, Call 4 Health expects to increase its daily call volume to 50,000 and client base to 2,000.

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